April 11, 2022
Professor Tappin instructs students in the NHTI Manufacturing Engineering Program
Professor Tappin instructs students in the NHTI Manufacturing Engineering program

Manufacturing engineering technologists design, develop, and improve the processes that create products each and every day. 

At NHTI – Concord’s Community College, the experiences within the Manufacturing Engineering Technology programs build confidence and technological competence and enable problem solving.

In this article, we are gonna talk with Dennis Tapping, he is the associate professor of engineering technology and program coordinator for the Manufacturing Engineering and Robotics and Automation Engineering Technology programs at NHTI. 

Dennis comes from a background of industry engineering and operations roles covering machine tools, technical educational products, medical, defense, and aerospace.

What is it like to make a product or create a manufacturing process?

Even a simple, everyday tool – say, a hammer made from steel – goes through a dizzying sequence of steps to go from a raw material to a finished product. 

Each step of the hammer’s transformation needs someone who understands the technical details to create a product of high quality and generate process efficiency for production.

Metals are commonly shaped through the use of machine tools. Machine tools, such as milling machines, turning machines, and grinders, are configured with various cutting tools and the methods to hold raw materials.

 Once each operation is set up, a block or rod of steel will be cut to size.

What manufacturing process will be learned over the course of a semester at NHTI?

Over the course of a semester, NHTI students learn to manufacture a hammer head and a hammer handle to create a real tangible product they can take home. 

The simple hammerhead has over a dozen features; each feature has a defined set of parameters, and the challenge is in learning how to interpret the instructions, set up the equipment, and operate the machine tools.

The final hammer is inspected to meet size and shape specifications that are as precise as the diameter of a human hair.

Hands-on experience at NHTI to build student’s confidence with manufacturing technology

Using industry level engineering specifications and process instructions builds aptitude and an appreciation for technical details – which N.H. employers look for in potential employees. 

Students who engage in this hands-on experience have exhibited a new affinity for making and see themselves succeeding in a high demand career.

Creating a final product from a raw material develops within NHTI students the foundation to contribute to a modern world and fulfill the roles needed by industry.

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Dennis Tappin is the associate professor of engineering technology and program coordinator for the Manufacturing Engineering and Robotics and Automation Engineering Technology programs at NHTI. Dennis comes from a background of industry engineering and operations roles covering machine tools, technical educational products, medical, defense, and aerospace.