English Course Descriptions

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Number sequencing next to course name means the following: first digit designates the number of lecture hours for the course; the second digit designates the number of lab, clinic or practicum hours; and the third digit designates the credit hours for the course.

ENGL 100C Introductory English 4-0-4
This course prepares students for success in English Composition through active reading, critical thinking, and the writing process (including prewriting, drafting, organization, development, coherence, and editing), with attention to grammatical concepts that affect clarity and style. The four institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. Students are expected to receive a grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 100C to advance to ENGL 101C English Composition.

ENGL 101C English Composition 4-0-4
Required of all first-year students and designed to teach students to write clear, vigorous prose, this course takes students through all stages of the writing process. Essay topics range from personal narratives to logical arguments. All students learn the resources of the NHTI library and write at least one documented research paper. Available in Honors format. Available in Honors format.

ENGL 102C Introduction to Literature 3-0-3
This survey course introduces students to representative works from major genres, such as fiction, poetry, and drama. Through reading, writing, and class discussion, students analyze texts to understand the role of literature in culture. Available in Honors format.

ENGL 110C/THTR 110C Introduction to the Theatre 3-0-3
This course will provide a broad survey of the basic components of theatre. Because theatre is a study of the possible, that is, what may result from the collaboration of many talents, we will study it from a number of different perspectives. We will examine plays, the history of theatre as an art, acting, technical theatre, theatre's impact on society, and important practitioners in the field. Plays are unique in all of literature, because they are only finished in performance in front of an audience. To understand how plays come to their complete realization, we will see several productions, both on and off campus. The student will be responsible for the cost of one ticket for an off campus production.

ENGL 120C Communications 3-0-3
This survey course focuses on the application of communication principles and theories, enabling students to develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal and nonverbal language and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes a variety of speeches, exercises, and writing assignments. Available in Honors format.

ENGL 120MC Communications 3-0-3
Through this survey course focusing on the application of communication principles and theories, students will develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal and nonverbal language and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes a variety of speeches, exercises and writing assignments. Sections identified as CM (Communicating Mindfully) feature the study of mindfulness and incorporate mindfulness meditation as an instructional method while exploring aspects of contemplative neuroscience and emotional intelligence as they relate to effective communication.

ENGL 120WC Communications 3-0-3
Designed for students who intend to continue their education beyond the associate's level, this course emphasizes writing and communication skills to help students succeed in upper level college courses. This writing intensive seminar puts equal emphasis on process and product, giving students the opportunity to develop metacognitive abilities and improve interpersonal communication skills. Through this survey course focusing on the application of communication principles and theories, students will develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal and nonverbal language and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes a variety of speeches, exercises and writing assignments. Sections identified as CW (Communicating Mindfully) also feature the study of mindfulness and incorporate mindfulness meditation as an instructional method while exploring aspects of contemplative neuroscience and emotional intelligence as they relate to effective communication.

ENGL 121C Introduction to Film 3-0-3
Utilizing film genres and movements, this course is an introductory historical examination of the art, history, language and theory of the moving image from the silent era to the present. The class explores major film artists in the genres and movements of Early Film, German Expressionism, Soviet Realism, Documentaries, Film Noir, Cinema Verité, Comedy, and Neo-Realism.

ENGL 125C Communication and the Literature of Science and Technology 3-0-3
Built around the theme of science and technology, this course focuses on improving communication skills. Areas of study include critical reading, critical thinking, public speaking, interpersonal communication and writing. Topics of readings may vary and could include any of the following: physical and technical sciences; natural and health sciences; or social sciences.

ENGL 135C Introduction to Media Studies 3-0-3
This course focuses on the nature, development, and effects of various media in relation to culture and society. Students will gain an understanding of print and electronic media, public relations, advertising, media policy and law, global communications, and media ethics. Coursework includes a variety of presentations, exercises, and writing assignments. (Successful completion of EN 101 strongly recommended.) Note: This course does not satisfy NHTI's Humanities or English Literature requirements.

ENGL 150C Introduction to Drama 3-0-3
An introductory survey involving the study of drama as literature and performance beginning with the Greeks and continuing through Shakespeare to the present. Through lecture, discussion and projects, students will become familiar with historical and cultural changes in the drama.

ENGL 160C Introduction to Poetry 3-0-3
This course exposes students to the history and the art of poetry and helps them develop their critical skills as readers. Students study the various types of poem, both closed and open form, along with the most important structural elements of poems. Available in on-line format.

ENGL 201C English Composition II 3-0-3
Aiming at higher levels of writing competencies, this class focuses on analysis, argument and research. It addresses issues of style and structure, from the sentence level to the whole essay, and incorporates peer review and critique. Students are required to collect and evaluate information, to analyze subjects from a variety of critical perspectives and to use logic to present and defend conclusions. Students compose essays of varying lengths, including shorter reflections and more sustained arguments. Individual instructors may choose to offer the course based on a theme. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C with a grade of “C” or higher)

ENGL 210C British Literature I 3-0-3
This course traces the development of British literature from the Middle Ages through the early eighteenth century and includes readings in poetry, fiction, essay, and drama. Authors' works will be examined within the cultural contexts in which they were created. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG; 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

ENGL 211C British Literature II 3-0-3
This course traces the development of British literature from the late eighteenth century to the present. The poetry, fiction, essays, and dramas of several major authors of the Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods will be studied. Authors' works will be examined within the cultural, contexts in which they were created. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

ENGL 214C American Literature Survey I: to 1865 3-0-3
The course traces American Literature to 1865. Students read representative major, as well as minor, writers from all literary periods and various movements. Readings are set in the cultural contexts in which they were created. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.) Available in on-line format.

ENGL 215C American Literature Survey II: 1865 - present 3-0-3
An historically-based survey course covering American literature from 1865 to the present. It is designed for English majors and others interested in the character and history of United States literature. Students read representative major, as well as minor, writers from various literary periods and movements. Readings will be set in an historical and cultural context. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101 or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

Special topics courses listed under ENGL 221C Film Genres and Directors
Courses under this heading will offer students an advanced, focused examination of the art, history and theory of a body of narrative films, which may be related by genre, filmmaker, country, style, movement, theme and/or culture and ideology. Through viewing, lectures and class discussion, students are expected to develop a greater understanding of film theory, criticism and history. (Prerequisite: successful completion of both ENGL 101C, or equivalent, or permission of the Department Head of English; an introductory level literature course is highly recommended)

ENGL 221AC - Images of Light 3-0-3
Utilizing viewings, lectures and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism and history, Images of Light explores the creative and dynamic interrelationships of filmmaking, particularly between the director and the director of photography; between the vision of a film and its realization.

ENGL 221BC - Films of 1962 3-0-3
This course examines the year 1962 in film. Through film viewing, lectures, projects and discussions the student explores how and why international filmmaking reached its apogee in 1962 as well as the lasting effects of these films and the filmmakers.

ENGL 221CC - American Independent Cinema 3-0-3
An Independent Film is a film that has been funded independently of a Major Studio, typically the monies come from limited partnerships, personal loans, presales, private investors and even credit cards. The late 1980's and 1990's saw a tremendous emergence of US independent cinema, as an enormous variety of eccentric and challenging filmmakers and evolving film styles came to America. This course will focus on American Independent Film Directors, the process of conception, funding to creation and distribution of their initial film will be examined. With several Directors we will explore their achievements as well as their studio flops.

ENGL 221DC - The Modern Classics 3-0-3
Utilizing viewings, lectures, class discussions, presentations and emphasizing film theory, criticism and history, "The Modern Classics" (the influences on or films since the 1994 release of Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction") explores the audacity, range, depth and stylistic experimentation of the newest wave of filmmaking, as seen through American and foreign films.

ENGL 221EC - German Expressionism 3-0-3
Utilizing viewings, lectures and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism and history, German Expressionism explores the creative and dynamic interrelationships in Germany of the Expressionist Film Movement in the time between the two world wars as well as the re-interpretation of that period prior to reunification. Expressionism and Post-Expressionism as movements will be explored within the context of the times, concentrating on the intensity of the artist's inner world capturing the nightmarish quality of artistic vision. Emphasis will be placed on the "mood" of Expressionism and how art anticipates history.

ENGL 221FC American Cult Cinema 3-0-3
The course will allow us to view, research, and discuss nearly two dozen motion pictures more or less widely regarded as "bad movies" in one or more ways. In seeking to determine intelligently what factors might contribute toward cinematic badness, we will consider subject matter, personal and societal prejudices, the effects of the passing of time, the effects of change, stigmatization of particular movie genres and/or directors and/or actors, and a wide variety of other aspects relating to viewer perception of a movie's quality or lack thereof.

ENGL 221GC - Darkness & Light: Film Noir 3-0-3
Utilizing viewings, lectures and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism and history, Darkness & Light: Film Noir explores the origins of Film Noir and examines not only pre-noir films but also noir films of the classic period as well as noir films of the post-classic and modern periods.

ENGL 221HC - Alfred Hitchcock 3-0-3
An in-depth study of the film techniques and unique storytelling genius of Alfred Hitchcock, including an examination of the influences of other directors and cinematic movements on Hitchcock. This course will trace his career as the "Master of Suspense" from his early films in England to his American works and includes the star system, character development, storyboards, and the art of the action montage.

ENGL 221IC - Stanley Kubrick 3-0-3
As a director known for controversial films such as Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, and A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick repeatedly bucked the Hollywood mainstream, emerging as an outsider who resisted the scrutiny of conventional film criticism and biography. This class will study in-depth the film techniques, influences of other directors and cinematic movements, and unique storytelling of Stanley Kubrick.

ENGL 240C Cultural Identity through Young Adult Fiction 3-0-3
Students will read, discuss, and evaluate a range of literature written for young adults (grades 8-12). This course will investigate the social and cultural “norms” that are presented to teens through the literature written for them. Students will consider whether YA literature is reflective of changing cultural norms, or if the shifts in popular literature can shape the collective identity of a generation of teens. In addition to exploration of mass media spin-offs and popular literature fads, students will also critically analyze the major contributing authors in modern YA literature, and how the common themes teens deal with are handled by those authors. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher, or permission of the Department Head of English)

ENGL 251C Contemporary Drama 3-0-3
A seminar focused on major European and American drama since the 19th century. Through reading, discussion and lecture regarding the works of major writers, students are exposed to contemporary issues in the development of the dramatic art. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

ENGL 255C Shakespeare 3-0-3
A study of representative works by William Shakespeare. Selections are chosen from histories, comedies, and tragedies. Students are introduced to the social and cultural characteristics of the Early Modern Period, to, the biography of the author, and to various issues surrounding the life and works. No previous knowledge of Shakespeare is assumed. (Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 101 or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended)

ENGL 260C The Novel 3-0-3
A genre class designed for advanced students, “The Novel” selects from a wide range of representative texts in this essential literary form. Students will read approximately eight works of fiction. Selections may be drawn from any period of literature from the 18th-century origin of the form up to the present and may incorporate both texts written in English as well as English translations of non-English texts. Readings will be set in their historical and cultural contexts and will display the wide range of texts covered by this word “Novel.” (Prerequisite: Honors only.. Students must have earned a B+ or better in ENGL 101C or receive approval from the instructor.)

ENGL 272C Modern Short Fiction 3-0-3
A study of fiction focusing on elements and themes of the short story art form in stories written in the past 150 years. Through close reading, lectures and discussions, stories are placed in the contexts of literary trends, and periods. Biographical information may also be studied to gain a better understanding of the unique styles and perspectives of individual authors. (Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended)

ENGL 285C Literature, Technology and Culture 3-0-3
This course examines the cultural implications of science and technology in the modern world. Students study a range of essays and fictional works in traditional literature, science, and science fiction, which may include such works as Frankenstein and Brave New World. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

ENGL 286C/TECP 86C Introduction to Linguistics 3-0-3
The course focuses on linguistics, the scientific study of language. We will explore the properties of language and the linguistic challenges faced by English language learners. The course will expand upon the subfields within the linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Concepts relevant to teaching English will be taught: pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Language variation and written discourse will also be addressed as well as how to apply this knowledge to the English language classroom. Linguistic principles and features of both English and other languages will be examined to promote familiarity with the language experiences of English language learners. A native speaker of a world language will act as a “grammar text” as we decipher an unknown grammar in a field methods format. This course is required for those in the TECP: ESOL certification program. Others must have permission from the Director of TECP or the Director of Cross Cultural Education. (Prerequisites: ENGL 101C, minimum of "B" average in ENGL 101C.)

ENGL 287C Women in Literature 3-0-3
Through readings, lectures and class discussion, images of women in literature are traced from Eve through contemporary characters, incorporating critical analysis of selected works in fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.) (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.) Also Available in on-line format.

Special Topics courses listed under ENGL 291C Contemporary Issues and World Literature
An investigation of current and enduring issues through world literature. Topics vary from year to year and with the instructor. See department for details of current offerings. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.) Available in Honors format.

ENGL 291AC Contemporary Latin American Literature 3-0-3
Through a study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film, and drama, this course traces images and examples of Latin American culture through various Latino landscapes and Latin American countries, comparing folklore and legends as well as literary conversations and connections to American and European literature. The emphasis is on contemporary works. Available in on-line format.

ENGL 291BC Contemporary Spanish Literature 3-0-3
Through a study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film, and drama, this course traces images and examples of Spanish culture and relevant issues through various landscapes, comparing current and post-war issues as well as literary conversations and connections to American and European literature. The emphasis is on contemporary works. It is available in the on-line format. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 101C or equivalent and an introductory level literature course are highly recommended.)

[Students interested in an enrichment travel experience related to this course should contact the English Department Chair. The travel portion of this course is not required. Students should note that the cost of the trip to Barcelona is not included in the tuition for this course. Students are responsible for all costs of this trip.]

Special topics courses listed under ENGL 295C Creative Writing
In order to develop and refine their abilities in a particular literary genre, students compose and present original work and critique the work of their classmates. Through as study of original as well as published work. Students explore the various elements of drama, fiction or poetry or mixed genre. Information on preparing a manuscript for submission and publication may also be included. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or permission of the instructor; a literature course is recommended)

ENGL 295AC Creative Writing: Fiction 3-0-3
A workshop dedicated to an in-depth study of the craft of fiction writing. Students write original fiction pieces and complete writing exercises that focus on elements of fiction. Students critique the short stories of their classmates. In order to refine and develop their understanding of character, setting, conflict, voice, symbol, engaging beginnings, and satisfying endings, students study examples of published short stories. Students learn how to submit manuscripts for publication. Available in Honors. and on-line formats. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or permission of instructor. Students who do not have the prerequisite may be asked to submit a writing sample before enrollment is confirmed. Suggested additional prerequisite: a literature elective.)

ENGL 295BC Creative Writing: Poetry 3-0-3
This course is designed for writers interested in learning about the craft of poetry writing. Students will present original work to their teacher and classmates for discussion and critique as well as examine published works. Additionally, the students will explore the various elements of poetry. Students will be expected to spend the majority of their time writing and revising original works. Information on preparing a manuscript for submission and publication may also be included. (Prerequisite: EN 101 or permission of the instructor; ENGL 102C or ENGL 160C is recommended)

ENGL 295CC Creative Nonfiction 3-0-3
This course provides an introduction to the art and craft of writing creative nonfiction, an approach to "telling the truth" that uses many of the tools of both fiction writing and journalism. Students will read, write, critique, and analyze pieces demonstrating the different styles in this genre: memoir, essay, and literary journalism. In addition, this course will include lectures, workshops, and peer editing. Students will experiment with the basic techniques of journalism, such as researching, reporting, and interviewing. The goal is to help students write stories that give meaning to experience, in a way that touches others. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or by permission of the instructor)

ENGL 295DC Playwriting 3-0-3
To illuminate and guide each student through the art and craft of writing for performance. This course explores the fundamental principles needed to build a realistic play that is intended to be produced upon the stage. Though the course is built around the construction of plays, the principles, writing exercises, readings, and other assignments serve as a solid base for any form of dialogue-driven writing. The class will culminate in the writing and staged-readings of 10-minute plays and performance texts. Students are expected to attend, at their own expense, one live theater production to be specified. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C with a grade of “C” or higher) [Students receiving credit for ENGL 295DC cannot also receive credit for THTR 120C.]

ENGL 295EC Creative Writing: Young Adult Fiction 3-0-3
This course is designed for writers interested in learning more about the craft of writing fiction for young adults. Students will examine published short stories and novels in the classic and contemporary canon for readers ages 12-17, as well as present their own work and critique the work of others. Students will explore some of the subgenres of young adult fiction in more depth, including science fiction and fantasy, edge, and horror, and study how the major themes relevant to teen readers are addressed in those subgenres. Students may choose to work on a series of short stories or on a longer, novel-length piece. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher, or permission of the Department Head of English)

ENGL 298AC Contemporary Spanish Literature: Barcelona Travel Lab 1-0-1
Following the study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film and drama, this course explores through travel to Barcelona many of the places referenced in these works and provides a hands-on experience of Spanish culture. It is intended to reinforce and set the learning acquired in ENGL 291BC. (Prerequisite: ENGL 291BC with a grade of “C” or higher) [Students should note that the cost of the trip to Barcelona is not included in the tuition for this course.  Students are responsible for all costs of this trip.]

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