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At NHTI we pride ourselves on offering you rigorous and dynamic classes that use innovative pedagogy with project learning initiatives and real-world scenarios to prepare you for your career and future educational goals. Our instructors offer industry experience and expert insights into lessons.

Defined here are terms, definitions, and categories with which you should be familiar:

  • Prerequisite: These are courses that must be passed prior to proceeding with a more advanced course; the minimum passing grade for a prerequisite course is a D- unless otherwise indicated.
  • Corequisite: These are courses that must be taken concurrently (at the same time) with another course; with departmental permission, a corequisite course may sometimes be taken in advance of the course for which it is a corequisite.
  • Course descriptions: These are presented by subject heading with the corresponding lettered course designator.
  • Courses numbered 100-199: These courses are typically introductory and/or freshman-level. Some may require assessment testing and/or completion of prerequisites prior to enrollment.
  • Courses numbered 200 or higher:  Instruction in these courses assumes students have successfully completed one or more semesters of college-level study prior to enrollment. Additionally, some courses may require one or more specific prerequisites.

ACCT 101C           Accounting I

An introduction to accounting procedures and principles covering the accounting cycle, accounting for a merchandising business, special journals, control over cash, receivables, and inventories. A grade of C or higher must be achieved to continue with the next Accounting course.

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours:3

ACCT 102C           Accounting II

A continuation of the fundamentals of accounting concepts and procedures, including the following topics: depreciation, payroll, notes payable, bonds, partnerships and corporations. A grade of C or higher must be achieved to continue with the next accounting course. (Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in ACCT 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ACCT 110C           Managerial Accounting

A study of the analysis, reporting, and use of accounting data as a management tool for planning, control, and decision-making. Specific areas of study include break-even analysis, financial statement analysis, cost classification and allocation, standard costing and variance analysis, and budgeting. (Prerequisite: ACCT 102C)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

ACCT 205C           Intermediate Accounting I

A review of the overall accounting cycle, followed by an in-depth study of accounting concepts and FASB statements dealing with topics to include balance sheets, income statements, receivables, inventories, and cash flows. (Prerequisite: ACCT 102C)

Lecture Hours: 4   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 4

ACCT 206C           Intermediate Accounting II

A study of accounting principles dealing with asset acquisition and retirements, long-term investments, current and contingent liabilities, debt securities and equity securities, capital structure of corporations, revenue recognition, and leases. (Prerequisite: ACCT 205C)

Lecture Hours: 4   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 4

ACCT 230C           Taxes

A study of the Internal Revenue Tax Code as it relates to individuals and small businesses. This course will include an examination of income recognition, deductions for and from AGI, tax credits, depreciation calculations, and analysis of capital gains and losses. The student will apply this knowledge in preparation of income tax returns and related forms. (Prerequisite: ACCT 102C or permission of the department chair of Accounting)

Lecture Hours: 4   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 4

ACCT 250C           Cost Accounting

Provides cost accounting fundamentals including manufacturing statements, job cost systems, process cost systems, standard costs, and cost analysis. (Prerequisite: ACCT 102C)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

ADCL 120C          Survey of Addictive Behaviors and Treatment

A study of addictive behaviors and treatment from a multi-modal presentation of historical, sociological, political, and medical issues and their importance relative to the treatment of addictive behaviors in today’s society.

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

ADCL 205C          Fundamentals of Dependency Counseling Skills

This course includes a comprehensive and detailed study of application both in documentation and treatment of the 12 core functions. Emphasis will be on preparation for onsite practice and for eventual state and national licensure and certification. (Prerequisite: ADCL 120C or permission of the department chair of Human Service)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ADCL 230C          The Four Domains of the Certified Recovery Support Worker

This eight-week online course includes detailed and comprehensive information on the educational components required by the N.H. Licensing Board for Alcohol and Other Drug Use Professional as well as education in the Four Domains of the CRSW credential. This course meets the educational requirements for the CRSW. To receive the CRSW certification, students must contact the Licensing Board and meet additional requirements, which include 500 hours of paid or volunteer work, completion of the ICandRC exam, and any other conditions as required by the board. This credential is ideal for anyone seeking a career in the substance use disorder profession, specifically pertaining to the recovery of individuals suffering from the disease of addiction.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ADCL 235C          Physiology and Pharmacology of Addiction

An in-depth study of psychopharmacological aspects of drugs is covered including a study of brain and body drug metabolism, medical complications, and the treatment of psychiatric disorders as outlined in the most current edition of the DSM. (Prerequisite: ADCL 120C or permission of the program coordinator of Addiction Counseling or the department chair of Human Service)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ADCL 296C          Addiction Practicum I

The first internship experience offers 30 hours of classroom-based group clinical supervision in support of 125 hours of fieldwork in an approved clinical setting. The student learns to integrate into an agency atmosphere within which they may research, observe, role-play, and practice the fundamental skills of screening, intake, orientation, assessment, treatment planning, counseling, case management, crisis intervention, client education, referral, record keeping, and consultation. (Prerequisites: ADCL 120C, ADCL 205C, HSV 111C, MHTH 187C, PSYC 105C, PSYC 283C, and HSV 242C, each with a grade of C or higher; PSYC 220C and ADCL 235C may be taken as a prerequisite or a corequisite or by permission of the program coordinator of Addiction Counseling or the department chair of Human Service.)

The student will also complete an interview with the practicum coordinator the semester prior to the first scheduled practicum. Special requests regarding practicum entrance may be brought to the department chair by the student. Review of the requests will be made by the department faculty and special exemptions may be made for entrance into the practicum.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

ADCL 297C          Addiction Practicum II

The second internship experience offers 30 hours of classroom-based group clinical supervision in support of 125 hours of fieldwork in an approved clinical setting. The student assumes increased responsibility culminating in substantial use of the fundamental skills of screening, intake, orientation, assessment, treatment planning, counseling, case management, crisis intervention, client education, referral, record keeping, and consultation in direct contact with clients/patients. A greater understanding of available treatment resources is accomplished via an inspection of the statewide continuum of care. (Prerequisites: AD 296 with a grade of C or higher and permission of the program coordinator of Addiction Counseling or the department chair of Human Service)

The student will also complete an interview with the practicum coordinator the semester prior to the first scheduled practicum. Special requests regarding practicum entrance may be brought to the department chair by the student. Review of the requests will be made by the department faculty and special exemptions may be made for entrance into the practicum.

Lecture Hours: 2   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8   Credit Hours: 4

MNFP 105C         Engineering Drawing I

Understanding and interpreting engineering drawings is an essential tool for the machine tool technician. Basic engineering drawing practices will be covered including multi-view projection, dimensioning, section and auxiliary views, basic GDandT concepts, and hole/thread callouts. Sketching assignments will reinforce common drawing practices and conventions. While the course focuses on reading and understanding drawings, a basic introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) will be included.

Lecture Hours: 2   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2   Credit Hours: 3

MNFP 110C         CNC Programming and Operation I

This course covers fundamentals of computer numerical control (CNC). Basic programming and operation of CNC machines are covered. The course begins with manual programming practices so the student will understand the programming code and its structure. Standard safety conventions will be introduced for safe programming practice. Computer simulation exercises will facilitate the learning process as the student gains practice in checking and trouble-shooting programs. The basic operation of CNC milling machines and lathes are covered. The lab uses software simulations where students test their program prior to use on the CNC machines and actual CNC machine operation. The lab is geared so that students will understand what and how the program and machine will function. (Prerequisite: MNFP 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3   Credit Hours: 4

MNFP 112C         CNC Programming and Operation II

This course is a continuation of CNC Programming and Operation I. Advanced programming methods and practices are covered in more detail. An introduction to computer aided manufacturing (CAM) is used to generate more complex part geometries using a software package. Advanced machine operations will also be covered such as 4-axis programming and machining. The lab will allow the student to practice programming skills and give them additional practice time on actual CNC machines. (Prerequisite: MNFP 110C)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

MNFP 114C         Applied Shop Mathematics II

This is a second course in Applied Shop Mathematics covering in-depth practical mathematical problems taken from the machine tool industry. Emphasis is placed on applied geometry and applied trigonometry using various techniques and methods to solve complex toolroom type machine problems. (Prerequisite: MNFP 104C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

MNFP 115C         Engineering Drawing II

This is a second course in reading, interpreting, and analyzing engineering drawings and the information conveyed to the machine operator or tool maker. This course will give the student more exposure to engineering drawings and a better understanding for interpretation of the information presented. Students will also create hand sketches and be introduced to computer-aided design (CAD) software to create working drawings. (Prerequisite: MNFP 105C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

MNFP 203C         Manufacturing Processes III

A third course in manufacturing processes covers complicated machine tool techniques and processes used in general machine shop practice. High precision machine work is the focus with tool making projects. Students will make various complicated lab projects that reflect tool-making ability. (Prerequisite: MFNP 102C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 9    Credit Hours: 4

MNFP 204C         Manufacturing Processes IV

A fourth course in manufacturing processes covers more elaborate tool-making concepts and techniques. Lab projects include complicated machining of high tolerance parts. Lab work will include the traditional manual machines as well as CNC machining centers. (Prerequisite: MNFP 203C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 9    Credit Hours: 4

AGRI 110C            Sustainable Agriculture I

Students will learn about agricultural disease and pest identification and management, ratios and proportions for mixing fertilizers and additives, soil and water chemistry, niche market identification, and agricultural adaptation to climate change in New England, as well as local and federal regulations and an introduction to resources for farmers. Lecture format will include formal lectures, guest speakers, and field trips. Labs will include in-lab research, experiments, and on- and off-campus fieldwork. Students will choose an area of specialization based on their market niche to begin the development of their portfolio.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

AGRI 112C            Practical Applications for Sustainable Agriculture I (8 weeks)

This course will take place at a local farm using sustainable agriculture practices. Students will participate in all levels of farm operation from seed selection and ordering to pest, soil and water management, and transplanting crops. Focus areas will include soil analysis, financial and regulatory record keeping, greenhouse set up, chemical use and safety, and equipment selection and operation.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

AGRI 115C            Practical Applications for Sustainable Agriculture II (8 weeks, Summer only)

This course will take place at a local farm using sustainable agriculture practices. Students will be involved in harvesting, crop rotation and direct sowing, pest management, soil health and watering. Students will also gain practical knowledge about bringing a product to market, food safety and contamination, food and crop loss, health and safety regulations and documentation. Students will build a portfolio that can be adapted and used when they work in the field. The portfolio will contain all necessary licenses, certifications and financial documentation needed for all agricultural businesses.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

A grade of C or higher is required in BIOL 195C, BIOL 196C, BIOL 202C, CHEM 125C, and in ADED courses (unless course syllabi state otherwise) to progress in the Dental Hygiene program. Courses with virtual/online labs are not accepted.

ADED 100C         Dental Hygiene I

An introduction to the theories and principles of the delivery of dental hygiene care, including evaluation of the patient, professional and clinical services. Emphasis will be placed on current concepts in preventive dentistry.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 103C         Dental Hygiene II

An introduction to common systemic diseases with emphasis on dental hygiene treatment planning, as well as the prevention and management of medical and dental emergencies. Topics discussed relate to substance abuse, stress, occupational and environmental hazards, and special needs patients. (Prerequisites: BIOL 195C with a minimum grade of C, ADED 100C, ADED 113C, and ADED 134C.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 105C         Dental Radiology for Dental Assisting

Lectures and demonstrations are coordinated with lab practice on mannequins to develop mastery of dental radiographic techniques to include digital radiography, processing, mounting, and evaluating films. Emphasis

will be placed on client and operator protection, exposure and processing errors, asepsis protocol, radiographic techniques, and equipment function. Two clients will be scheduled near the end of the term when students exhibit acceptable and safe skills.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 110C         Dental Assisting Science I

A study of the anatomy of the head, emphasizing the osteological landmarks and the structures of the oral cavity. Both the permanent and primary dentitions are studied, including embryonic development and eruption patterns. In addition, an introduction to the structure and function of the human body systems in health and disease will be presented.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 111C         Dental Assisting Science II

An introductory study of drugs with specific consideration of those used in dentistry. Emphasis on drug origin, properties, dosages, and therapeutic effects. Studies in oral pathology will include signs and symptoms of the diseases common to the oral cavity to include neoplastic disease and the inflammatory response. (Prerequisite: ADED 110C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 113C         Clinical Dental Hygiene I

A pre-clinical course for the development and application of information relating to preventive dental hygiene services. Includes topics on asepsis, infection control, gathering and evaluating patient medical and dental histories, legal and ethical considerations, body mechanics, intra and extra oral exams, and instrumentation. Use of adjunct dental hygiene aids is also taught. Skills will be practiced on student partners. A classroom seminar for learning activities and group discussion is included. All students enrolled in ADED 113C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Corequisites: ADED 100C and ADED 134C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 114C         Clinical Dental Hygiene II

A continuation of Clinical Dental Hygiene I. Students will apply techniques learned directly on clinical patients. Emphasis is placed on the introduction of additional dental hygiene instruments, as well as dental health education techniques. A classroom seminar for learning activities and group discussion is included. All students enrolled in ADED 114C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisites: ADED 100C, ADED 113C, and ADED 134C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 126C         Nutrition

An introduction to the basic fundamentals of the science of nutrition for the dental hygienist. Essentials of adequate dietary intake and nutritional balances and imbalances including total body health and dental care are discussed. Topics include the role of nutrients in the development and maintenance of hard and soft oral tissues, nutritional needs throughout the life cycle, and nutritional issues that may impact oral health. Special emphasis is placed on the application of dietary analysis and nutritional counseling as a preventive dental service. (Prerequisite CHEM 125C with a minimum grade of C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 134C         Oral Anatomy I

A detailed study of the anatomy of the deciduous and permanent dentitions. Also included is tooth eruption and basic dental terminology. This course includes lab sessions coordinated with lectures to provide practical applications of dental anatomy.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 1    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 136C         Oral Anatomy II

A detailed study of the embryonic development and anatomy of the hard and soft tissues of the face and oral cavity. Study of the anatomical structure of the head and neck with emphasis on the cranial nerves, muscles of mastication and facial expression, temporomandibular joint, vascular and lymphatic systems, tooth development, and histology of dental tissues and supporting structures. (Prerequisite: BIOL 195C with a minimum grade of C, ADED 113C, ADED 134C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 140C         Dental Radiology for Dental Hygiene

Lectures and demonstrations are coordinated with laboratory practice on mannequins to develop mastery of digital dental radiographic techniques as well as processing, mounting, and evaluating films. Other topics include radiographic interpretation, radiographic landmarks, and localization techniques. Emphasis will be placed on patient and operator protection and equipment function. Patients will be scheduled near the end of the term when students exhibit acceptable skills. (Prerequisites: ADED 100C and ADED 134C; corequisites: ADED 136C and ADED 114C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 155C         Oral Hygiene Education/Nutrition

Methods of preventive oral hygiene education, including patient motivation, will be discussed. Lectures in nutrition will stress the importance of good eating habits in maintaining optimal general and dental health. Emphasis will be given to the essential role of the dental assistant in counseling the patient in these disciplines. (Prerequisite: ADED 110C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 161C         Dental Materials-DA

Study of the composition and properties of materials used in dentistry. Lab sessions emphasize practice in manipulation of various materials.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 162C         Dental Materials-DH

An introduction to the composition and properties of dental materials with emphasis on materials currently utilized in dental and dental hygiene treatments. Lab sessions are coordinated with lectures to provide practice in manipulation of materials with emphasis on impression taking and preparation of study casts. (Prerequisite: CHEM 125C with a minimum grade of C, ADED 114C, ADED 136C, or permission of the department chair of Allied Dental Education)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

ADED 175C         Dental Assisting Theory I

Designed to teach the dental assisting student clinical techniques. Includes information on sterilization and disinfection techniques, charting, and the use of dental equipment and instruments. Students are introduced to four-handed chairside assisting as it pertains to all types of dental procedures including oral evacuation, instrument transfer, tray set-ups, and completing dental clinical records. Emphasis is placed on the dental health team concept.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 182C         Office Procedures and Management with Computer Applications

Development of working knowledge of office procedures to include communication and telephone techniques, appointment scheduling, and document management including HIPAA regulations. Other topics include fundamentals of financial systems, dental insurance, inventory control, and job search preparation. Technology in the business office and the use of specialized office management software is highlighted. (Prerequisite: ADED 110C) 

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 191C         Dental Assisting Clinical Experience I

Clinic sessions are coordinated with lectures in preclinical theory. Demonstration and practice of procedures in simulated clinical situations including maintaining office asepsis, instrument sterilization, 4-handed chairside assisting, patient interaction and comfort, health history management, preliminary oral inspection, and taking alginate impressions. An introduction to recording patient information in Dentrix will also be included. All students enrolled in ADED 191C will be charged a clinical surcharge per semester.

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 4    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 196C         Dental Assisting Clinical Experience II

Experience in a dental office performing chairside assisting, laboratory procedures, office procedures, and exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs. A classroom seminar for group discussion is included. All students enrolled in ADED 191C will be charged a clinical surcharge per semester. (Prerequisites: ADED 105C, ADED 110C, ADED 161C, ADED 175C, and ADED 191C) 

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 5

ADED 201C         Dental Hygiene Theory III

A study of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal disease from a histological and clinical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the dental hygiene practitioner’s role in clinical assessment and recognition of the pathological periodontal changes and the response of the diseased tissues to therapy. Discussions are coordinated with experience in a laboratory and clinical setting. (Prerequisites: ADED 103C, ADED 114C ADED 136C, and ADED 140C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 1    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 212C         Clinical Dental Hygiene III

Practical application of dental hygiene theories and techniques with emphasis on individual patients’ oral health needs and the further development of oral prophylactic and radiographic techniques, including the preparation of diagnostic aids and patient education. Students will gain experience through work in their on-campus clinical assignments. All students enrolled in ADED 212C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisites: ADED 114C and ADED 201C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 12    Credit Hours: 4

ADED 221C         Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

Practical application of dental hygiene theories and techniques with emphasis on individual patients’ oral health needs and the further development of oral prophylactic and radiographic techniques, including the preparation of diagnostic aids and patient education. Students will gain experience through work in their on-campus clinical assignments. All students enrolled in ADED 221C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisite: ADED 212C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 12    Credit Hours: 4

ADED 225C         Dental Hygiene Community Clinic

Practical application of dental hygiene theories and techniques with emphasis on the oral health needs of special patient populations. Students will gain experience in a variety of educational and public health settings. (Prerequisites: ADED 114C and ADED 201C)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 4    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 227C         Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence

A study of the ethical and legal issues involved in dental care delivery as well as office management procedures.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 239C         Concepts of Risk Management

This course will orient the student to risk management of a medical condition/emergency and dental record documentation. Ethics and jurisprudence topics related to risk management are also included. (Prerequisite: ADED 110C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 242C         Community Dental Health I

Students will gain information in dental public health. Emphasis is on planning, education, healthcare promotion, epidemiology, evidenced-based research, basic biostatistics, cultural competence, and healthcare financing. (Prerequisite: ADED 201C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 243C         Community Dental Health II

Students will implement the theory base from DN 242 into the Spring semester with practical applications of the ADED 242C course content. The course will entail completion of various projects and assignments with a community emphasis. (Prerequisites: ADED 212C and ADED 242C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 244C         Pain Management for the Dental Hygienist I

This course is designed to prepare student dental hygienists for the safe and effective administration of local anesthesia nerve blocks and infiltrations. The course includes classroom, lab, and clinical instruction. Course topics include the psychology of pain management, patient assessment and treatment planning, anesthesia techniques, complications, pharmacology of anesthetic agents, emergency precautions and management, ethical considerations, and a review of anatomy and physiology in relation to the administration of anesthetic agents. On successful completion of this course and graduation, participants will have completed the educational requirements for a local anesthesia permit for the state of N.H. All students enrolled in this course will be charged a $200 pain management supplies fee. (Prerequisites: ADED 103C, ADED 114C, ADED 136C, ADED 140C, CHEM 125C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 246C         Pain Management for the Dental Hygienist II

This course is designed to provide didactic and lab instruction in nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia in accordance with American Dental Association Guidelines. The dental hygiene student will acquire comprehensive knowledge and skills necessary to safely and effectively administer nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation with local anesthesia injections. On completion of this course and graduation from the Dental Hygiene program, students will have completed the educational requirements for nitrous oxide administration and monitoring for certification by the state of N.H. All students enrolled in this course will be charged a $200 pain management supplies fee. (Prerequisites: ADED 212C and ADED 244C; corequistie: ADED 221C)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 4    Credit Hours: 1

ADED 247C         Dental Hygiene Science – Pharmacology

Emphasizes the study of drug origins, properties, dosages, and therapeutic effects. Specific consideration is given to those drugs used in dentistry and anesthesiology. (Prerequisites: BIOL 196C and BIOL 202C with minimum grades of C and ADED 136C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 248C         Dental Hygiene Science – Oral Pathology

Oral pathology includes the study of diseases affecting the oral cavity, manifestations of inflammation, degenerative changes, neoplastic disease, and anomalies. Oral pathology prepares the student to detect deviations from normal in the assessment of a client’s systemic and oral health status and to make appropriate decisions regarding referral and treatment when needed. (Prerequisites: BIOL 196C and BIOL 202C with minimum grades of C and ADED 136C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 275C         Dental Assisting Theory II

Introduces the dental advanced functions to dental assisting students. Includes instruction in basic instrumentation concepts, removal of coronal cement, application of pit and fissure sealants, suture removal, coronal polishing, expanded orthodontic functions, and the monitoring of nitrous oxide sedation. Preclinical skills

will be introduced on mannequins and competency skills on patients. Advanced Dentrix computer applications will also be included. (Prerequisites: ADED 105C, ADED 110C, ADED 161C, ADED 175C, ADED 191C.)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

ADED 298C         Dental Assisting Clinical Experience III

Expanded opportunities in chair-side assisting to encompass all dental specialties including orthodontics, surgery, endodontics, pedodontics, and prosthodontics. A weekly seminar is held to evaluate the individual clinical experiences. (Prerequisites: ADED 196C, ADED275C, up-to-date CPR and clinical clearance with current health insurance and liability insurance, DANB Radiation, Health, and Safety Certificate)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

In addition to listed prerequisites, students must earn grades of C or higher in each major field course and AGGP prerequisite to progress in the program.

AGGP 101C          Introduction to Game Design and Creation with Programming

Introduces the student to game design with a focus on core programming concepts and common game mechanics. No prior knowledge of game development is assumed. Several hands-on game programming assignments demonstrate real-world implementations of abstract concepts. A research paper on the game industry and development topics is assigned. Each student is required to create a small game project during the last several weeks of the course. (Co/prerequisite: CPET 107C, or with permission of program coordinator)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 103C          Introduction to Content Development

Gain practical experience in developing content using applications, techniques, and standards used by the game industry. This course includes an introductory overview of image editing and manipulation, sprites, tiles, and tile-based worlds. Course material is reinforced with hands-on assignments and the creation of a portfolio. (Prerequisite: Working knowledge of current desktop operating systems.) Students who do not intend to enter the AGGP program should consider enrolling in VRTS 193C: Introduction to Photoshop.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 131C          Introduction to 2-D and 3-D Game Development

This course focuses on the fundamental aspects of programming, development, and design for games using 2-D gameplay. Other topics explored include an introduction to 3-D programming, single-system multiplayer programming, multi-platform programming, and support for data originating from level editors. The coursework is structured with several hands-on projects, classroom presentations, a team project, and a final public presentation. (Prerequisites: AGGP 101C, AGGP 103C, CPET 107C, or permission of program coordinator)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 140C          Digital Art Modeling and Animation

An introduction to modeling and animation for game programmers to provide a common understanding to work with artists and designers in an effective manner. Topics include modeling, material creation, basic lighting, and an introduction to skeletal animation. Models will be created and then used to understand animation and asset pipelines using current industry tools and engines. Course topics are applied through practical hands on assignments. (Prerequisite: AGGP 103C or permission of program coordinator)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 225C          3-D Game Engine Application Development

Use of a commercially available game engine or framework. The majority of the work in the class will be hands-on using these technologies. A common practice within the industry is team development of applications using licensed game engine technology. Students will understand how to use the engine’s interwoven mesh of different systems, which include user input, networking, and rendering. Game modification, also known as “modding,” and source control will be covered. Prerequisites: AGGP 131C, AGGP 140C, CPET 125C, or permission of program coordinator.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 231C          Application Development and Software Prototyping

Current application development can target multiple platforms across a range of devices such as phones, tablets, smart devices, consoles, and personal computers. Students will study current technologies for cross-platform development and deployment. Several intense hands-on software prototype projects will be required where students will design a concept, build a proof of concept, and conduct a postmortem review. (Prerequisites: AGGP 131C, AGGP 140C, CPET 125C, or permission of program coordinator)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 247C          Math and Physics for Game Programmers

Math and physics play key roles in game programming. Effective use of math is needed for code design, data structures utilization, using design patterns, developing artificial intelligence, using scripting engines, controlling 3D pipelines, and texture-mapping development. Math is also needed to implement the physics utilized in Newton’s laws and concepts of collisions and reactions. Programmed applications that use math and physics in game development will form the foundation for this hands-on course. (Prerequisites: AGGP 101C, CPET 125C, both AGGP math electives, or permission of program coordinator)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 291C          Project Definition and Portfolio Specifications

Students begin the construction of a professional industry portfolio. Assignments given to support an effective portfolio include collecting and polishing potential portfolio pieces, crafting resumes and cover letters, and learning job search networking techniques. An exemplary individual project is required in addition to other assignments. A study of game theory and game projects will be used to define a team capstone project to be undertaken in AGGP 294C. (Prerequisites: Completion of all AGGP major courses in the first year of the curriculum; corequisites: the student must be enrolled or have already taken all AGGP major courses for the Fall semester of the second year curriculum or have permission of program coordinator)

Students enrolling in AGGP 291C come with the expectation that they will directly enroll in AGGP 294C the next semester. Students who do not take AGGP 294C in the next semester after taking AGGP 291C must re-take AGGP 291C before enrolling in AGGP 294C. Students who have passed AGGP 291C but are required to re-take the course should be aware that the cost of the course may not be covered by financial aid and should consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to registration.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

AGGP 292C          Portfolio Development

AGGP 292C builds on the work started in AGGP 291C. The lab in this course is devoted to a major portfolio piece or for students to be available for an internship off-campus. Students are expected to prepare a presentation of their work as part of this course. (Prerequisite: AGGP 291C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

AGGP 294C          Animation and Graphic Game Programming Capstone Project

Students will be working on campus in team projects or off campus on internships. Students will be creating projects based on the specifications developed in AGGP 291C. The lab portion is devoted to student project development. All work will be supervised by an NHTI instructor and students are expected to work at an industry performance level. Final team presentations of the work accomplished are part of this course. (Prerequisites: AGGP 291C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 5    Credit Hours: 4

ANTH 101C          Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

analyze human diversity and similarities among people throughout the world, both western and non-western, through cross-cultural comparison. Topics include culture and society; ethnographic research; ethnocentrism and cultural relativism; how societies adapt to their environment; different forms of marriage and social relationships; male, female, and other forms of gender; the social functions of religion; and the processes of social-cultural change.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ANTH 210C          Native American Studies I

A study of North American Indian cultures from the lithic period to the 21st century. Origin of Native American civilization and development will be studied, including lifeways, religion, ceremonies, arts, and social organizations. The course will first focus on Mesoamerica during the pre-Columbian period. The study then proceeds to an in-depth review of the people/tribes of the Northeastern and southeastern woodlands and the Great Plains cultural area.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 101C           AutoCAD 2-D

This is an introductory course in computer-aided design (CAD) for beginning students. Topics include drawing setup, line drawing, text placement, orthographic drawing, basic editing, and dimensions. This hands-on course focuses on the most common basic functions necessary to complete 2-D drawings including move, mirror, copy, offset, trace, OSNAP, and distance. Projects incorporate basic techniques of drawing and CAD. This course is part of the CAD Certificate program. Students are expected to be able to read and interpret architectural/engineering graphics.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 102C           AutoCAD 3-D

This course introduces students to architectural 3-D CAD applications, 3-D manipulation of entities, and the creation and control of views in 3-D space through isometric and perspective projections. Topics include 3-D drawing, coordinate systems, viewing, rendering, modeling, and output options. On completion, students will be able to prepare basic architectural 3-D drawings and renderings. This course is part of the CAD Certificate program. (Prerequisite: ARET 101C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 103C           Architectural Graphics and Sketching

The first semester is devoted to the basic ways of representing architectural ideas graphically through the development of sketching and computer-aided drawing (CAD) skills. Architectural line techniques, lettering styles, geometric construction, principles of projection, and drawing expression are the areas of early concentration. Architectural design issues are studied regarding residential planning and siting. The student produces floor plans, foundation plans, site plans, elevations, building sections, wall sections, and details. An introductory structural analysis for foundation loading is explored. Production of drawings by sketching and CAD demonstrates the student’s ability to perform. (Corequisite: ARET 120C) CAD Certificate and Industrial Design Technology students taking this course are required to register for ARET 120C.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 104C           Architectural Design Studio I

The student will study the architectural design for an institutional building that is designated for public use. The terrain is sloping and provides for a two-story sloped roof structure that employs current construction methods. The student begins study through the use of sketch-to-scale drawings. With an outline of design criteria and project guidelines, the student develops preliminary presentation drawings for floor plans, elevations, and 3-D views. As the student comes to know and appreciate the design, the emphasis shifts to a more in-depth understanding of the technology of construction. The student prepares construction documents for floor plans, elevations, building sections, wall sections, and details. The preparation of preliminary drawings

and construction documents include sketching to scale and drawings produced by computer-aided design (CAD) AutoDesk software. The student demonstrates competency by studying, discussing and producing these drawings and presenting them to the class as a way of working on relevant verbal skills. (Prerequisites: ARET 103C and ARET 120C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 120C           Materials and Methods of Construction

A survey of the materials used in building construction, the methods used in assembling these materials into structures, and the forces acting on structures. Included are the characteristics and properties of each material and their relative cost. Materials and methods studied include site work, concrete, masonry, metals, wood, plastics, thermal and moisture protection, doors and windows, and finishes.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ARET 150C           Statics and Strength of Materials

A study of forces and the effect of forces on structural members in a state of equilibrium. It is the study of internal stresses and deformations that result when structural members are subjected to external forces through loading. While lectures and some labs deal mainly with the theory of force analysis and force systems solutions, lab projects involve the application of various stress and strain measuring instruments on many materials used in construction. (Prerequisites: MATH 124C and PHYS 133C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

ARET 160C           Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

An introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), and ESRI’s ArcGIS. Topics will include basic GIS concepts; the structure and availability of GIS data; the N.H. GIS database; creation of maps; editing and creation of GIS data; the use of GPS to collect information for use in GIS; and GIS processing and analysis. The course will combine lectures, hands-on exercises, and an individual student project over the course of the semester.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 191C           AutoCAD Architecture

This course is designed for architects and other building professionals. Participants begin with a conceptual massing model and work in 2-D or 3-D or both at the same time to create a design and draft construction documents. AutoCAD Architecture is built on traditional drawing tools of AutoCAD allowing students to create a building model with parametric architectural objects that behave according to real-world properties. Because all drawings derive from a single data set, they are perfectly coordinated and automatically updated throughout the entire design process. Students are expected to be able to read and interpret architectural/engineering graphics to register for this course.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

ARET 192C           Revit Architecture

Revit Architecture, a parametric building modeler based on parametric technology, enables the user to make a change anywhere in the building project and have it automatically updated everywhere else in the project. The course focuses on building a foundation for the basic elements in the software. Students are expected to be able to read and interpret architectural/engineering graphics to register for this course.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 194C           Microstation

This is an introductory course in Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) for beginning students using Microstation V8 software. Topics include drawing set-up, line drawing, text placement, basic editing and dimensions. The course structure focuses on the most common basic functions necessary to complete drawings including move, mirror, copy, offset, distance and more. Projects incorporate basic techniques of drawing and computer-aiding drafting. Note: students are expected to be able to read and interpret architectural/engineering graphics to register for this course.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 195C           BIM Technologies

Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a workflow for designing, evaluating, constructing, fabricating, and operating buildings. As BIM technology is developing this workflow is beginning to touch all aspects of the building industry. Understanding the role of BIM is critical to working in the building industry. The BIM model gives a building project a rich asset the entire team can use to deliver a better product to the building owners. Learn how BIM and BIM-related tools are used (and will be used in the future) in all phases of the building process from initial conceptual design to facilities management.

Students will learn how to use BIM models in multiple phases through the construction process, including performing energy and lighting analysis, construction simulations and interference reporting, quantity take- offs for construction cost estimating, and connection to an external database for building maintenance. (Prerequisite: ARET 192C with a grade of C or higher or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 202C           Architectural Design Studio II

Emphasis is placed on an architectural design solution for a multi-story addition to existing buildings and preparation of construction documents for an institutional building. The student will study a multistory steel- or concrete-framed and masonry-enclosed structure. Floor plans, elevations, sections, and details using materials typically used in construction today are sketched to scale and produced by computer-aided  design (CAD) AutoDesk software. Lectures relating to the basics of circulation, egress requirements, structural steel framing, masonry, codes, metal pan stairs, barrier-free design, handicap code requirements, fire protection, acoustics, glazing, curtain-wall systems, roofing and building energy conservation, and sustainable strategies supplement studio work. Students will study sustainable strategies and energy utilization through the use of energy-modeling software. (Prerequisites: ARET 103C and ARET 104C; corequisite: CVET 240C.) This course is not required of students in Architectural Engineering Technology – Civil Focus.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 250C           Environmental System

A survey of the environmental control methods and support systems used in contemporary buildings. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of each system and design of simple systems and how they relate to energy utilization and conservation in building design. Students will use energy-modeling software to study the design of a building. Economic comparisons and cost/benefit ratios are also studied. (Prerequisite: PHYS 135C.) This course is not required of students in Architectural Engineering Technology – Civil Focus.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 270C           Construction Management

A course dealing with the business phase of a construction project from working drawings and specifications to final completion of the structure. The architect, engineer, and contractor roles in coordinating project activities are discussed. Also covered are cost control (estimating) and contractual arrangements, including recent innovations of the industry. The impacts of green, sustainability, and energy conservation issues on construction management will be studied. Guest lectures and a field trip to an ongoing construction project will supplement classroom lectures. (Prerequisite: ARET 202C or CVET 201C, and ENGL 125C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ARET 297C           Architectural Design Studio III

The student chooses a project to design from a collection of instructor-approved projects requiring real site considerations. By discussing the relevant design criteria and selection of a hypothetical client outside class, the student develops and refines the program of space requirements and acquires an appreciation of the in-depth functionality of architecture, especially space adjacency requirements. The study includes an analysis of a site, structure, codes, circulation, material usage, and sustainability and energy considerations. Schematic and preliminary designs, with an emphasis on sketching for study purposes, presentations drawings and construction documents are produced by CAD AutoDesk software. Students build a study and final model, and are required to submit a progress report. An emphasis is placed on a thorough coordination of the work, application of current technology, and application of the knowledge gained in the ARET program. (Prerequisites: ARET 202C, CVET 220C, CVET 240C, ENGL 125C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 201C          Civil CAD

This course is an introduction to the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) software for civil engineering. Areas of application of the software within engineering include mapping, topography, site development, and subdivision. Within the field of highway design the student applies civil design software to detail roadway alignment and create final drawings of plan, profile, and cross section. Lab time is typically for the student to generate designs and drawings with the support of the instructor. (Prerequisite: ARET 104C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 202C          Soil Mechanics and Foundation Design

This course deals with the fundamentals of soil mechanics. Topics covered include moisture-density relations, mechanical and chemical gradation properties, basic shear strength theory, permeability, and compression. Lecture topics will be supplemented by field observations and lab work. On completion of this course, students will understand the essential elements of soil mechanics theory such that it may parlay into practical applications. (Prerequisites: ARET 150C, CVET 220C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 220C          Surveying

Familiarizes students with the equipment, procedures, and methodology of modern surveying practice. Includes measurement of distance, elevation, angle, and direction in the field with manual and electronic equipment. The methods of topographic, construction, and route surveying are also studied. Lastly, the student is taught to use software programs to aid in data collection, manipulation, and mapmaking. (Prerequisite: MATH 124C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 235C          Reinforced Concrete Design

Learn the fundamentals of design and analysis of steel reinforced concrete structures including beams, floor and roof slab systems, columns, foundation footings, and structural walls. Design sketches based on calculations and in accordance with the latest American Concrete Institute (ACI) building code requirements are prepared. Also a major lab project including designing, building, and testing a reinforced concrete beam is done by student teams. (Prerequisite: CVET 240C)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 240C          Timber and Steel Design

The study of structural steel and timber that involves the design and analysis of beams with regard to bending, shear, and deflection. Columns are studied with respect to axial and eccentric loading. Miscellaneous structural elements such as beam-bearing plates, column base plates, and welded and bolted connections are also designed. The student is taught to make calculations manually then with the aid of computer software. The lab time (2 hours per week) is dedicated to activities during which the student is fully involved in the design, analysis, construction, and testing of timber and steel beams, columns, connections, bracing systems, load packages, and simple frames. The observations and results are documented through calculations, drawings, photos, and computer-aided design. (Prerequisites: ARET 120C, ARET 150C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CVET 245C          Hydrology/Drainage Design

This entry-level course teaches students the basics of stormwater drainage. They will learn how to delineate a watershed, apply runoff calculations to the watershed, and determine peak design flows. These design flows will then be used to instruct students in the basics of hydraulics as it pertains to stormwater flow. They will learn how storm drainage systems are planned and what components make up a drainage system. They will leave the course understanding stormwater flow in culverts, how to determine if a culvert is flowing with inlet or outlet control, and how to use nomographs in the selection of a particular culvert. Students will apply this knowledge to basic open channel flow and learn about erosion and sediment control. (Prerequisite: CVET 220C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CVET 297C          Highway Design

This course focuses on the highway design process, beginning with transportation requirements and soil mechanics and continuing with highway location, site planning, geometric design, and pavement design. The knowledge gained equips students for project work. The course culminates with students’ preparation (using computer-aided design) and presentation of final engineering drawings of a section of roadway. This project is evaluated with respect to alignment, safety, aesthetic impact, construction cost and professional quality. Labs will involve the use of a soil-testing lab, and visits to nearby road construction sites will be scheduled. (Prerequisite: CVET 220C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 100C           Introduction to Biology with Lab

An introductory course in biology intended to satisfy the biology admission requirement for NHTI health-related degree and professional certificate programs. Topics include scientific method and measurement, cell structure and function, energy transformation, nutrient processing, gas exchange, circulatory systems, nervous systems, principles of homeostasis, and heredity. Lab exercises parallel lecture topics and include microscopy, dissection, biochemistry, and physiological experimentation. (For institutional credit only; does not count toward graduation requirements but is calculated into GPA; not intended for transfer.)

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 111C           General Biology I

Designed to provide the student with the basic principles of biology, including scientific method, cell structure, cellular biochemistry and energy transformations, and genetics. Labs are used to develop skills in scientific thought and common procedures used in biological experimentation. With BIOL 112C, intended to provide a foundation for further study in life sciences. (Prerequisites: Algebra I with a grade of C or higher; high school-level Biology and Chemistry with labs with grades of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 112C           General Biology II

A continuation of BIOL 111C. Includes a survey of the taxonomic groupings of life forms and the principles of evolution and ecology. (Prerequisites: BIOL 111C with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 115C           Introduction to Ecology

Designed to give non-science majors the opportunity to learn about the interactions between the physical and biological components of the environment. The lecture will provide a broad introduction to the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecological interaction. Instructional methods include readings, lecture/discussion, in-class applications, field observations, and field research. The lab portion will provide students with practical experience in ecological methods and the design, conduct, and analysis of ecological studies. Lab exercises are designed to correspond with major lecture topics. Exercises include lab and field studies. Student should come prepared to be outside for most labs. (Prerequisites: high hchool Biology with lab or BIOL 100C with a grade of C or higher; high school Chemistry with lab or CHEM 100C with a grade of C or higher; high school Algebra I or MATH 092C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 116C            Field Ornithology

This course introduces the student to the biology of birds and the methods of modern field studies, identification, life histories, ecology, and behavior of birds, with an emphasis on local species. The course involves a major field component (observing and identifying birds in their natural habitats) complemented by investigations into aspects of bird biology and ecology, such as habitat use, bird morphology; flight, song, nesting and reproductive behavior; and migration. No previous experience with birds is expected. Lecture and lab may include demonstrations, discussion, and field trips. (High school Biology strongly recommended, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 117C           Introduction to Plant Biology

An introduction to the structure and physiology of plants at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels; survey of major plant groups and their evolutionary relationships; and the relationships of plants to humans and other organisms. (Prerequisite: high school Biology with lab or NHTI’s BIOL 100C, both with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 120C           Human Biology

A brief summary of human anatomical structure and physiological systems designed to provide students with the knowledge and perspective necessary to work in their chosen fields. (High school Biology recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 122C           Basic Pathophysiology

Designed to provide the student with an understanding of the various mechanisms by which human diseases develop. Includes a survey of common disorders involving each of the major body systems. (Prerequisite: BIOL 120C with a grade of C or higher; or BIOL 195C and 196C with grades of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 123C           The Biology of Human Reproduction

Intended to give an appreciation for the importance of the following areas of reproduction: male and female anatomy and development, sexual differentiation, puberty, menstruation, parturition, lactation, assisted reproductive technologies, birth control methods, and menopause. (High school Biology recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 125C           Human Genetics and Society

An introduction to genetics for students not majoring in the sciences. The student will be introduced to the basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics and will apply these principles to human genetic traits. Causes and treatments of common inherited diseases will be discussed as well as genetic technologies and their applications (recombinant DNA technology, genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization). The associated ethical and social issues will also be examined. Lab component to complement lecture. (High school Biology recommended) 

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 129C           Introduction to Sports Nutrition

An introduction to the basic nutritional needs of those involved in individual and team sports. General nutrition topics will be interspersed with specific requirements and recommended intakes for athletes at all levels and ages. A variety of sporting activities, including those involving both endurance and strength athletes, will be covered. (High school Biology recommended) 

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 159C           Personal Nutrition

An introductory course including lab for the individual interested in nutrition as a tool for personal health promotion and disease prevention. Incorporates basic principles of nutrition with discussions of contemporary issues. Lab exercises allow for exploration of lecture topics and will include scientific method, food analysis, diet analysis, and nutritional lifestyle analysis. (High school Biology recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 180C           Tropical Ecology and Conservation

Designed to introduce the student to the ecology, natural history, and conservation programs at work in Costa Rica. The course will prepare the student through studies of major ecological principles, tropical ecology in general and of Costa Rica specifically, and the major ecosystems of Costa Rica. The historical, economic, and cultural aspects of Costa Rica and their relationship to resource conservation efforts will be examined. The culmination of the course will be a nine-day travel experience to Costa Rica, where the class will visit several major ecological systems and conservation areas. The lab portion of the course will consist of the nine-day excursion to Costa Rica through the NHTI-sponsored Culture Quest trip. The travel portion of this course is required. During the time in Costa Rica, students will apply what they have learned to understand the different ecosystems visited, identify tropical plants and animals, and appreciate the threats to and efforts to conserve the unique biodiversity of Costa Rica. (Prerequisite: High school Biology with lab with a grade of C or higher; high school Chemistry with lab with a grade of C or higher.) The cost of the trip to Costa Rica is not included in the tuition for this course. Students are responsible for all costs of this trip.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 195C           Anatomy and Physiology I

An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Includes elementary cytophysiology, histology, and anatomy and physiology of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, and special senses. Lab work parallels lecture topics and includes microscopy, study of human anatomical models, dissection of preserved animals, and physiological experimentation. (Prerequisite: High school Biology with lab and high school Chemistry with lab, each with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 196C           Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIOL 195C. Includes anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system, circulatory system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, excretory system, and reproductive system. Other topics covered include nutrition and metabolism, acid/base balance, fluid and electrolyte balance, and genetics. Lab work parallels lecture topics and includes microscopy, study of human anatomical models, dissection of preserved animals, and physiological experimentation. (Prerequisite: BIOL 195C with a grade of C or higher or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 202C           Microbiology

Lectures focus on three major areas: basic concepts of microbiology, including morphology and physiology of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses; host resistance to disease and immunology; and epidemiology of selected diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and parasitic worms. Labs focus on three major areas: basic skills such as staining, microscopy, and isolation techniques; bacterial physiology as is pertinent to identification of bacterial species; and control of microorganisms via chemotherapeutic agents, physical means, and chemical disinfectants. (Prerequisite: BIOL 112C or BIOL 196C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 211C           Genetics

A lab course intended to enhance a student’s knowledge of basic genetics and to provide the foundation necessary for further studies in molecular biology, cell biology, evolution, systematics, and behavior. Topics covered will include Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, immunogenetics, genetics of cancer, and population genetics. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112C or BIOL 196C with a grade of C or higher; MATH 124C, an equivalent, or higher-level math course [excluding MATH 129C] with a grade of C or higher; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 212C            Ecology

Investigations into the biological and physical factors affecting the distribution, abundance, and adaptations of organisms. Interrelationships at the population, community, and ecosystem levels will be studied. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112C or BIOL 196C with a grade of C or higher; MATH 124C, an equivalent, or higher-level math course [excluding MATH 129C] with a grade of C or higher; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 215C           Freshwater Ecology

Enhances students’ understanding of ecology and introduces them to the biological, chemical, and physical properties of lakes, streams, and wetlands as they relate to the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. Students will gain an understanding of freshwater environmental concerns and experience in water quality assessment. The course will also cover topics in sustainability, management, and rehabilitation of natural aquatic environments in relation to human impact. (Prerequisite: BIOL 111C, BIOL 112C, or BIOL 115C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 222C           Pathophysiology

Provides the Allied Health student with an understanding of disease processes by building on the student’s knowledge of normal anatomy and physiology. Common disorders of major body systems are discussed relative to the mechanisms by which they develop and their effects on homeostasis. (Prerequisite: BIOL 196C with a grade of C or higher or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 229C           Nutrition in Exercise and Sports

Introduces the student to nutrition as it relates to the improvement or optimization of physical performance. Dietary interventions for strength and endurance exercise training and sporting event participation will be thoroughly investigated. Special emphasis will be placed on weight management and the reduction, maintenance, and gain of body mass. (Prerequisites: BIOL 196C with a grade of C or higher, or BIOL 159C or an equivalent with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 235C           Principles of Evolution

Provides an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of genetic variation, natural and sexual selection, and patterns of evolutionary change, and will look at modern variations within the theory itself. The course also explores the historical development of the science and the modern social controversies associated with it. Pedagogical issues of teaching evolution may also be discussed. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112C or equivalent with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 239C           Public Health Nutrition

Provides the foundation and core competencies of public health nutrition. This will include the skills, knowledge, and tools used in assessment, community intervention, and evidence-based approaches to promote health and prevent diseases. This course will engage students in critical thinking and productive discussion around public health nutrition and health promotion. The course will address major public policy initiatives related to public health nutrition, health promotion, and disease prevention. This course requires students to be proficient in writing. Successful completion of ENGL 101C strongly recommended. (Prerequisites: BIOL 159C or BIOL 129C or equivalent with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 259C           Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition

An introductory course in normal and therapeutic nutrition designed for students in Allied Health programs. Focuses on the application of basic principles of nutrition to health promotion and disease prevention, as well as the role of nutritional intervention as a therapeutic tool in specific pathologies. Includes discussion of contemporary issues in nutrition. It’s recommended students not take BIOL 159C prior to taking this course. (Prerequisites: BIOL 196C or equivalent with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 260C           Cell Biology

For biology majors, focuses on eukaryotic cells. General topics include the structure and function of principal cellular components, energy metabolism, signal transduction, apoptosis, the cell cycle, gene expression, and an introduction to cancer biology. Lab experiments include modern cell research techniques such as ELISA, gel electrophoresis, and animal cell culture. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112C or BIOL 196C or equivalents with grades of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

BIOL 279C           Life Cycle Nutrition

Focuses on nutritional needs of the growing, developing human from conception to old age, with particular emphasis on the nutritional needs of infants, children, adolescents, adults, women, and aging adults. (Prerequisite: BIOL 159C or BIOL 259C with a grade of C or higher or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 290C           Senior Capstone Project and Seminar

Serves as the capstone course for the Biology Program. The student will demonstrate the application of the knowledge gained throughout the program. This will be achieved either by independent study on a topic chosen by the student with guidance from a faculty member or through participation in a field internship with an approved industry partner. Independent study will involve the investigation of all sides of a current biological issue. The student will turn in a written paper and make a presentation of his/her project to all interested students and faculty in a student seminar. (Prerequisites: all science and MATH courses with grades of C or higher and approval of the department chair; only offered in the final semester of the Biology program)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

 

BIPE 101C            Introduction to International Code Council Codes

International Code Council (ICC) building codes largely guide architecture, engineering, and construction industries to build safer and healthy built environment. Building codes continuously evolve in response to tragic incidents, technological advancements, and changing environmental dynamics. The scope and complexity of the building codes require practitioners, reviewers, and enforcers to remain well informed of the relevant building codes. Especially when federal, state, and local interpretations, adoptions, and enforcement vary. A brief history of the code development explores the formation of various building codes with regards to the occupants’ safety, health, well-being, and environmental issues.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIPE 105C            Construction Document Reading

Introduces the fundamentals of reading construction documents for residential and commercial projects and drawing conventions. The course focuses on residential construction documents including the survey, off-site and site improvements; the structure, plumbing, mechanical, electrical systems; foundations, and below-grade construction and introduces commercial construction documents reading and applicable codes.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIPE 110C            Plan Review

Highlights aspects of building planning review, fire protection systems review, means of egress, fire-resistance-rated construction, and interior finishes review. Some of the topics include international building

code plan review record, components of fire-rated construction, fire detection and fire suppression systems, and ADA-based design requirements. The critical aspects of plan review process forms the basis of this course. (Prerequisites: BIPE 101C, BIPE 105C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIPE 115C            State Construction Law

Surveys state construction laws from legal, practical, and professional dimensions. The topics include RSAs regarding structure of laws and rules, land use laws, fire code, building code, conflicting and complimenting RSA and building code, and other state laws/agencies including licensing of contractors/architects/engineers, food service, ADA, and case laws. This course will enhance the student’s understanding of construction problems from a building inspector’s perspective by familiarizing them with the critical aspects of construction law, its enforcement, and impacts on the construction industry and project costs.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIPE 120C            Legal Aspects of Enforcement

Provides insight into the local government law, state and federal legislative laws, administration and enforcement, administrative and constitutional laws, property law concepts, liability for intentional wrongdoing, negligent wrongdoing, civil rights actions, and the role of the witness. Discussions particularly focus on the issues of misfeasance, malfeasance, nonfeasance, latches, preemption, sovereign immunity, injunctive relief, appeals process, and indemnification.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BIPE 125C            Building Inspector Skills (Capstone)

Highlights the essential roles, skills, and responsibilities of a building inspector including careful inspections and reviews to ensure construction complies with all applicable national and local codes, zoning regulations, and contract specifications. Major topics include safe buildings, approaches to inspection, getting along, customer service, doing the right thing, and communication.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

BUS 101C              Introduction to Business

An introduction to the general concepts of business, including organization, forms of ownership, finance, management, marketing, production, and the relationship between business and society. The current business climate and attitudes will also be examined through the use of business publications and articles.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 152C              Foundations of Leadership

Students will examine the outlook, skills, and behavior essential to successful leadership. Topics include leadership theory, motivation, group dynamics, communication, management, status, power and politics, and organization culture and ethics. Students will develop an approach to the leadership style that works for them while at the same time exploring techniques to develop leadership skills in others. The focus of the course is to bridge the distance between leadership theory and management practice.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 170C              Principles of Marketing

An introductory course presenting such topics as the seven managerial functions of marketing, problem-solving, decision-making, marketing research, ethics in marketing, new product development, price determination, marketing channels, and advertising.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 174C              Principles of Sales

A study of the selling process as it relates to training professional sales people and the basic elements of the persuasion process. A systematic approach will be used to develop techniques to adjust to individual styles. Students will study the tasks of the sales manager and techniques that are used to hire, train, and compensate the sales force. (Prerequisite: BUS 170C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 180C              Principles of Retailing

Provides the basis for understanding the world of retail. Topics include retail strategy, store location, buying merchandise, assortment planning, inventory management, retailing, customer service, and store layout. (Prerequisite: BUS 170C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 221C              Healthcare Management in the U.S.

Examines healthcare trends within the U.S. The focus will be on the evolving nature of healthcare and current debates. Students will explore such topics as: history of healthcare, hospital reorganization, care delivery settings, administrative and caregiver role changes, reimbursement, managed care, and governmental interventions.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 225C              Business Law I

The study of the fundamental principles of law as they apply in the business world. The course examines legal rights and remedies and contracts. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the law of torts and contracts and will learn business law through related textbook readings and online research. This course emphasizes the relationship of business law to an individual’s personal and occupational life. Applications of the laws as they affect the individual in a moral society are featured.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 226C              Business Law II

Focuses on various forms of legal entities and Articles 2 and 9 of the UCC. The major laws governing securities, entities, antitrust, bankruptcy, and environmental issues are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the legal liability of the professional. This course is designed for the future business manager, entrepreneur, or professional who wishes to have information regarding laws governing business. (Prerequisite: BUS 225C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 240C              Small Business Management

Serves as the capstone experience for the Business Administration program through an integrated examination of formation, finance, marketing, operations, and the supply chain as applied to the small business. Conventional text assignments and assessments are supplemented with practical application of concepts and theory as teams of students operate a business via a web-based simulation. (Prerequisite: ACCT 101C, BUS 101C, BUS 170C, and BUS 270C or BUS 273C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 245C              Organizational Behavior

Helps students to develop a more complete understanding of the human dimensions of management. Emphasis is placed on the allocation of theory to real-world problems as well as the development of interpersonal skills. Topics include such issues as motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and interpersonal communication. (Prerequisite: BUS 101C or BUS 270C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 250C              Principles of Finance

A study of the planning and control involved in financial statement analysis, working capital management, cash budgets, cash flows, and break-even analysis within a corporate environment. (Prerequisite: ACCT 102C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 255C             Personal Financial Planning

Provides an effective learning experience in personal finance. Emphasis is on helping students make sound financial decisions in the areas of budgeting, insurance, taxes, credit, investment, real estate, and retirement planning. (Prerequisite: ACCT 101C or BUS 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 261C              Advertising

The basic principles of advertising and their role in media and society. This includes the advertising environment, agency and client relationships, consumer behavior, ethics, and the roles of research, creative appeals, and media selection in advertising effectiveness.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 270C              Principles of Management

Provides an understanding and appreciation of organizational structures and the role of the manager within these structures, with emphasis on the influence of the social sciences on current management theory.

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 273C              Human Resource Management

A study of human resource management including the evolution of the personnel process, organizational models, leadership patterns, and issues touching on planning, assessment, staffing, training, development, and environmental issues. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory and practice so students will gain a useful understanding of human resource management whether they seek careers in that field or in other disciplines. (Prerequisite: BUS 101C, BUS 170C, or HSTM 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0 Credit Hours: 3

BUS 290C              Management Internship

Engages students in individually supervised employment within an area of management requiring applications of management theory and principles to the work environment. Students must work at least 10 hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research related literature in the employment field, and prepare a substantive report on the work experience and studies involved. This course is limited to seniors and requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair. (Prerequisite: 2.8 GPA)

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 9 Credit Hours: 3

CHEM 100C             Introductory Chemistry

Intended to satisfy the chemistry admission requirement for NHTI health-related degree and certificate programs. Consideration will be given to fundamental atomic theory, chemical arithmetic, kinetic theory, solution chemistry, acids, bases and salts, and introductory organic chemistry. Lab included. Proficiency with the mathematical operations of high school Algebra I or MATH 092C strongly recommended. (For institutional credit only; does not count toward graduation requirements but is calculated into GPA; not intended for transfer.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 103C             General Chemistry I

Fundamental laws and concepts of chemistry, including elements, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, compounds, chemical equations, and stoichiometry. Labs are used to reinforce concepts presented in lectures and to develop skills in scientific thought and common procedures used in chemical experimentation. With CHEM 104C, intended to provide a foundation for further study in life sciences and physical sciences. (Prerequisites: high school Chemistry with lab with a grade of C or higher; pre/corequisite: MATH 124C or higher-level math or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 104C             General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 103C. Topics include gases and gas laws, solutions, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Also includes an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Labs are used to reinforce concepts presented in lectures and to develop skills in scientific thought and common procedures used in chemical experimentation. (Prerequisite: CHEM 103C with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 105C             Chemistry

Introductory and cursory course in which the fundamental principles of chemistry are developed. Included are topics in atomic structure, chemical bonding, electronic configuration, the Periodic Table, stoichiometry, solutions, gases, and acid-base chemistry. Appropriate lab experiments will complement the lectures. This course is not meant as a substitute for either CHEM 103C or CHEM 104C. High school chemistry with lab strongly recommended. (Pre/corequisite: MATH 124C or higher-level math or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 110C             Introduction to Biochemistry

Designed to provide Allied Health students with the basic principles of the chemistry of living processes. Includes the study of macromolecules, metabolic pathways, energy transformations, and enzyme action. (Prerequisite: high school Chemistry with lab or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 115C             Brewing: The Science Behind Beer

Explores the most basic and more complex chemical reactions that take place during the production of beer, as well as discusses the microbiology and how it impacts the brewing process from beginning to end. Reactions that affect each stage of the process are discussed as well as the mechanisms that are utilized to control the properties of the finished product. There is also a focus on the importance of hygiene throughout the brewing process. Students taking this class must be at least 21 years of age. A valid ID must be presented to the instructor at the first class for confirmation.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 120C             Introduction to Forensic Science

An overview of the multidisciplinary field of the forensic sciences. This course combines classroom lecture and lab analysis of samples from hypothetical criminal investigations to demonstrate the role of science and the forensic scientist in the criminal justice system. (Prerequisite: high school Chemistry with lab with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 125C             Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry

Designed for students who need an introductory chemistry course that covers the fundamentals across inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. This course focuses on the chemistry and chemical processes that operate in living systems. Topics will include physical and chemical properties of matter, chemical bonding, solutions, acids and bases, the properties and naming of organic compounds, metabolic pathways, and energy production. Appropriate lab experiments will complement the lectures. (Prerequisite: high school Chemistry with lab or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

CHEM 205C             Organic Chemistry

An introduction to the nomenclature, structure, and reactions of organic compounds. Lab. (Prerequisites: CHEM 104C or CHEM 105C with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3   Credit Hours: 4

COMM 201C             Interpersonal Communication

Focuses on the application of interpersonal communication principles and theories. Students will develop skills in perceiving self and others, nonverbal communication, emotions, relationships, and managing conflict. Students will also demonstrate an increased awareness of the cultural and ethical implications of interpersonal behavior. Coursework includes a variety of exercises and writing assignments, as well as a case study presentation. (Prerequisite: ENGL 120C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

COMM 202C             Intercultural Communication

Focuses on the application of intercultural communication principles and theories. Students will develop skills in understanding the importance and challenges of intercultural communication, the components of human communication and competence, family roles in other cultures, religion and values in other cultures, cultural history, values and identity in other cultures, verbal and nonverbal messages in other cultures, and managing intercultural differences. Coursework includes a variety of exercises and writing assignments, as well as research papers. (Prerequisite: ENGL 120C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

COMM 203C             Advanced Public Speaking

Focuses on the application of public speaking principles and theories. Students will develop skills in the essential elements of public speaking, managing apprehension, the 10-step process for preparing and presenting a speech, listening guidelines, and criticism of speeches. Students will also demonstrate an increased awareness of the cultural and ethical implications of public speaking. Coursework includes a variety of writing assignments, presentations, and speeches. (Prerequisite: ENGL 120C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

COMM 204C             Communications Capstone

Consists of students developing a multi-media case study to integrate and apply learning from their communications courses in a comprehensive manner. Students will evaluate and apply their personal, professional, and ethical growth and critical thinking skills in the study of communication by analyzing a public relations crisis in an organization. They will formulate conclusions, recommendations, ethical implications, and applications for future scenarios for the crisis in the organization. (Prerequisites: completion of all courses in the Communications degree or enrollment in the capstone during the final semester)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

These are individual courses and are not part of any program.

 CAD 101C             CAD I

Basic training in the use of computer-aided design (CAD) including entity creation, editing, dimensioning, file management, and plotting. A hands-on approach will be taken while using PC-based AutoCAD software. Applications will be taken from a variety of disciplines. This course does not meet requirements for the MET/MFT programs.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

CAD 102C             CAD II

A continuation of CAD 101C into more advanced concepts in computer-aided design. Topics include wire frame, surface and solid modeling, and techniques to improve productivity. This course does not meet requirements for MET/MFT programs. (Prerequisite: CAD 101C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

CAD 103C             CAD III

A continuation of CAD 101C and CAD 102C. Emphasis is placed on 3-D parametric solid modeling using Autodesk Mechanical Desktop. Student will develop skills and utilize techniques to produce geometric profiles that serve as a database for the production of 3-D models, working drawings, bill of materials, and exploded views of assembled models. This course does not meet requirements for MET/MFT programs. (Prerequisites: CAD 101C and CAD 102C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

Students must earn a grade of C- or higher in each CPET and ELET course listed as a prerequisite to a subsequent CPET course.

CPET 107C           Introduction to Programming with C++

Introduces the student to program design using the language C++. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Focuses on effective structured design of code with variables, decisions, loops, functions, arrays, and introduction of pointers. Use of professional programming design approaches and coding style will be used in lab assignments. Completion of this course provides the programming design skills to continue on with the study of the language C++ or other computer languages.

Lecture Hours: 2     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3     Credit Hours: 3

CPET 125C          Data Structures

Introduces students to abstract data types, object-oriented programming, and algorithm analysis. Students will use procedural and object-oriented techniques to program stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, and binary trees. Asymptotic (Big O) notation will be used to analyze data structures and sort algorithms. The effective use of C++ topics such as pointers, operator overloading, and templates will be covered. Students will write programs in C++ and Java. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

CPET 215C          Integrated Circuits and Interfacing

For CPET and other NON-EET majors. Supplements ELET 115C with basic linear and interface electronics. Topics covered include simple power supplies, op-amps, stepper motors, A/D and D/A conversion, and interfacing a computer bus. Advanced digital topics such as synchronous logic, programmable logic devices and digital signal processing will also be covered. The labs demonstrate real world implementation of otherwise abstract academic concepts. Fluency with the use of test equipment and debugging skills will also be stressed in the lab environment. It is strongly recommend the student having previously taken or to be concurrently taking ELET 144C. (Pre/corequisite: CPET107C, ELET 101C, and ELET 115C, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

CPET 222C          Data Communications and internetworking

Provides the student knowledge and skills in a wide range of topics covering data communications, packet transmission, and the internet. Data communications subtopics include transmission media, serial communications, error detection and correction schemes, data security, and signal processing required for long-distance communications. Packet transmission subtopics include local area networks, hardware addressing, LAN building blocks, and wide area networks. internetworking subtopics include TCP/IP communication stack, ISO 7-layer communication stack, network addressing, internet protocol, address resolution protocol, internet control message protocol, IP routing protocols, transport control protocol, user datagram protocol, and client-server API. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C and CPET 125C; corequisites: CPET 240C, CPET 252C recommended; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3   Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

CPET 240C          Programming for Windows Operating Systems

The Microsoft Windows API and Microsoft.Net Framework will be covered from Windows Applications to full utilization of the internet. Microsoft Visual Studio.Net with its integrated development environment will be studied and utilized. Topics include Windows services, DLLs, accessing databases using ADO.NET, programming for the internet using ASP.NET, .NET assemblies, and advanced features of programming languages used to access the Widows API and .NET platform. Experience will be gained using extensive hands-on lab assignments. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C, CPET 125C or AGGP 121C, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

CPET 252C          Networking and internet Technologies

Provides the student knowledge and skills in a diverse range of topics including structured query language, client-server programming, selected internet applications, and LAMP. SQL subtopics include relational database concepts, the SQL language and relational database design. Client server programming is studied in C++ using socket APIs and Java using socket classes. Selected internet applications include domain name system, hypertext transfer protocol, and file transfer protocol. LAMP topics include a Linux overview, Apache web server configuration, dynamic web pages using PHP, and MySQL relational database. Each student is also required to define, implement, demonstrate, and present a networking project. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C, CPET 125C or AGGP 121C, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

CPET 260C          Computer Real Time Interfacing

Focuses on interfacing computers to the outside world. The course content focuses on practical real-time and multithreaded programming techniques used in interfacing with computer inputs and outputs. The course is divided into two major parts: A programmable logic controller industrial computer using the language relay ladder logic (Boolean algebra based) is used to teach the fundamentals of real time control; the second part covers multithreading programming techniques and issues including resource sharing, deadlock, critical sections, mutexes, and events. A final project is presented to the class. (Prerequisite: CPET 107C; corequisite: CPET 125C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

CPET 301C          Computer Project Definition

A first phase to CPET 303C. During this course, a student selects a project that is either provided by an industrial sponsor or chosen by the student. The selections are made with the guidance and approval of the instructor. The student will meet with the sponsor to initiate the project and then will write a specification to define the project. (Prerequisite: CPET 107C, ELET 101C, ELET 115C, CPET 125C; corequisites: CPET 240C, CPET 260C, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

CPET 303C          Computer Project

The student will complete the project defined in CPET 301C while maintaining logbook to provide the advisor with progress reports. A formal oral presentation describing the project and a demonstration is required. (Prerequisites: CPET 301C, CPET 240C, CPET 260C, ELET 144C; corequisites: CPET 222C and CPET 252C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 4    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 101C          Introduction to Criminal Justice

Presents the history, development, and current status of the criminal justice system in the U.S. and the challenges it faces. When appropriate, the opportunity is taken to visit relevant agencies.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 121C           Criminal Procedure

Analyzes the constitutional issues in the U.S. that have direct bearing on the role and policies of criminal justice agencies. Application of these issues as they relate to investigation, arrest, pretrial, and appeal will be emphasized. The course is a combination of the case law and lecture method.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

CRMJ 123C          Criminal Law

Combines an examination of the historical origins and development of criminal law as a form of social control. It will include the general principles of constitutional and statutory factors as they pertain to criminal liability, defenses to criminal charges, and sentences. The final emphasis is placed on the substantive aspect of criminal law and how it differs from civil law.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

CRMJ 150C          Criminology

A detailed analysis of the development of criminological theory, embracing the contributing disciplines of biology, psychology, sociology, political science, and integrated theory combining those disciplines. Attention is also paid to the offender/victim relationship.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 205C          Police Administration and Operations

Covers the principles of police organization, administration, community policing, and the selection, training, promotion, and socialization of officers. It deals with the conflicting roles that the police and individual officers face in today’s society as part of the justice system. It also examines issues involving the influence of research, police deviance, minorities, the use of force, and the general hazards of police work.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 210C          Juvenile Justice Administration

Theories, causation, and prevention programs are studied. Rehabilitative theories and treatment programs of public institutions and public and private agencies are included. Case studies are made available to the student for analysis. Adolescent behavior, peer pressure, and the role of the family will be examined.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 215C          Corrections Operations

A study of correctional processes and services, standards, personnel, and principles of management. Includes the allocation of resources, training and staffing, the role of sentencing and work release programs, special programs, and the use of outside contracts.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 225C          Drug Abuse and the Law

In the first part, the historical use of the major drug groups (including alcohol) will be reviewed. In the second part, the reaction of the criminal justice system to illegal involvement with drugs and alcohol and methods of treating substance abusers will be reviewed.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 230C          Justice and the Community

Deals with the interaction of the various components of the justice system with the community. It involves an analysis of the way the work of police departments, courts, correctional institutions, and community corrections agencies appear to the public. The image of the justice system in the media is examined; specific attention is paid to the issues of the young, minorities, and community organizations.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 270C         Internship

Offers the student the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application. The student is responsible for seeking out the agency placement with the assistance of the course instructor. The internship requires the completion of a mandatory minimum number of hours. A log is kept and the final grade is based on a combination of the log, supervising agency assessment, and final analytical report.

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 9    Credit Hours: 3

CRMJ 275C          Senior Project

Through ongoing and individualized contact with the supervising instructor, the student develops a topic pre-approved through a prospectus. The student may develop any topic raised in any major class and is not limited by category. Empirical studies, surveys, and literature reviews are among the acceptable categories of research. The final grade is determined by a review of the final product and the extent to which the student has followed the course guidelines.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

HMSC 101C          Introduction to Homeland Security

Introduces students to the study of the agencies necessary for the protection of the U.S. and the relationships among them. It will examine the individual and cooperative roles of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, as well as the roles of private security agencies and first responders in implementing the Homeland Security Act. (Open to current TSA employees only)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

HMSC 105C          Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

Provides an overview of national intelligence community operations and the collection and analysis of information. Students will see how the resulting intelligence products help provide a common operating picture for security management at all levels of government. Students will develop an understanding of the methods for collection and analysis of data to develop intelligence products to support both tactical operations and strategic planning for Homeland Security leaders. (Open to current TSA employees only)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

HMSC 110C          Transportation and Border Security

Provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as different methods employed to address these challenges. This course covers a time period from post-Sept. 11, 2001, to the present. The course explores topics associated with border security and security for transportation infrastructure to include seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges, rail lines, pipelines, and buses. The course will include an exploration of technological solutions employed to enhance security of borders and transportation systems. Students will be required to discuss the legal, economic, political, and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. The course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the variety of challenges inherent in transportation and border security. (Open to current TSA employees only)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 201C             Principles of Sonography

An introduction to principles of ultrasound with emphasis on physical principles, instrumentation, and terminology. Lab sessions will offer hands-on learning techniques.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

DGMS 221C             Sonographic Physics

Study of the physical principles involved in ultrasound and state-of-the-art equipment technology. (Prerequisite: DGMS 201C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 233C             Seminars in Sonography

Sessions will be used for case presentations by students and preparation for registry exams. (Prerequisites: DGMS 297C and DGMS 241C)

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

DGMS 241C             Principles of Vascular Ultrasound

Study of physical and doppler principles utilized in the ultrasound study of vascular structures. Lab sessions will introduce students to scanning techniques used in vascular studies. (Prerequisites: DGMS 201C, DGMS 221C.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

DGMS 265C             Sonographic Anatomy and Pathology I

Study of gross, sagittal, and cross sectional anatomy of the abdomen and the pathological changes and disease processes that are found in ultrasound examination of the abdominal region.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 266C             Sonographic Anatomy and Pathology II

A continuation of DGMS 265C with an introduction of small parts anatomy and an in-depth study of pathologic changes and disease processes found in relation to these structures. (Prerequisites: DGMS 201C and DGMS 265C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 275C             Sonographic Principles of OB/GYN I

In-depth study of the anatomy of female reproductive organs and associated pathological changes with introduction to first trimester fetal development.

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 277C             Sonographic Principles of OB/GYN II

A continuation of DGMS 276C, with emphasis on the continuing process of fetal development and associated pathologic conditions. (Prerequisites: DGMS 201C and DGMS 275C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DGMS 291C             DMS Clinical Procedures I

Two days per week of observation and direct hands-on experience in the campus lab designed to familiarize students with working procedures in an ultrasound lab. Basic examination techniques will be performed. Students will work with each other and faculty on ultrasound equipment, simulators, and computer applications.

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 12    Credit Hours: 4

DGMS 296C             DMS Clinic II

Three days per week of clinical experience at selected clinical sites. Students will gain continued scanning experience. All students enrolled in DGMS 296C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisites: DGMS 201C, DGMS 265C, DGMS 275C, and DGMS 291C)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 24    Credit Hours: 6

DGMS 297C             DMS Clinic III

Four 8-hour days per week at selected clinical sites for a 10-week period with emphasis on expanded roles in the ultrasound studies. Students will develop intermediate level skills and recognition of pathology will be stressed. All students enrolled in DGMS 297C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisites: DGMS 221C, DGMS 266C, DGMS 277C, and DGMS 296C)

Lecture Hours: 0     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 21    Credit Hours: 5

DGMS 298C             DMS Clinic IV

Four days per week of final experience to strengthen scanning and interpretation skills in preparation for challenging registry exams and entry into the sonography field. All students enrolled in DGMS 298C will be charged a $500 per semester clinical surcharge. (Prerequisites: DGMS 241C and DGMS 297C)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 32    Credit Hours: 8

DCOM 105C             Digital Communications

Provides an introduction to digital communications covering key digital platforms such as websites, search engines, social media, email, and mobile applications. Using research spanning the digital communications industry, students create a marketing plan focused on the digital landscape. Students will learn to understand how digital marketing influences consumer behavior and the importance for businesses of optimizing their approaches to utilizing the internet.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DCOM 130C              Ecommerce, Websites, and Blogging

Students create a functional website with a blog and e-commerce modules. The course covers basic website design, e-commerce management, and blogging techniques. Students will examine the multidimensional functions of websites and the importance of optimizing websites for ROI.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DCOM 150C             Social Media Strategy

Students create and implement a social media marketing plan. Topics addressed include determining and matching social media tactics with the appropriate marketing target, and developing a strategic approach to engage each market segment using several social media channels.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DCOM 210C             Search Engine Optimization

Introduces a strategic approach to search engine marketing, keyword research, algorithms, competitive analysis, link building, local and geo search, and SEO tools. Through online platforms, applications, and tracking methods, students develop the vocabulary of industry professionals. Students will learn to understand how search engines influence consumer behavior and the importance for businesses of optimizing their strategic approach. (Prerequisite: DCOM 105 strongly recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DCOM 230C             Email and Mobile Promotion and Marketing

Provides an introduction to email and mobile marketing. Topics include email communication, creating an email, automation, spam, metrics, mobile sites, loyalty programs, mobile search, and analyzing the user journey. Students learn how email and mobile marketing influences consumer behavior and the importance of optimizing the business approach. (Prerequisite: DCOM 105 strongly recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

DCOM 250C             Digital Analytics

Provides an introduction to theory and strategy in data and analytics. Students examine the foundations to optimize their online approach. Students will obtain certifications in Google Analytics, Google Adwords, and Hubspot; these professional certifications can be utilized throughout their profession to solve real-world challenges. (Prerequisite: MATH 251C and DCOM 210 strongly recommended)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 101C              Growth and Development of the Young Child

Major theories and research findings in the physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional domains of development of young children from conception through age 8. The work of Piaget (constructivism), Erikson (psychosocial theory), and Maslow (hierarchy of needs) will be emphasized. Students will use various tools to observe and record the development of young children in early care settings as they explore domains and theories. Emphasis will be placed on understanding children’s development in the moment and the power of observations. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 130C              After School Basics

Provides individuals interested in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate curriculum with a focus on before and after school care that covers kindergarten through grade 5. Topics covered include growth and development, learning environments and curriculum development, observation and assessment of youth, interactions and engagement; family, school and community relationships; safety and wellness, and professional development and leadership. Students will learn these topics with the intent to promote respect for cultural diversity and create inclusive and respectful environments. This curriculum aligns with the National Afterschool Association and the N.H. After School Credential. Students will be expected to carry out 2 hours/week of observation and practice hours in an after school setting.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 143C              Teaching and Learning – STEAM

With emergent curriculum as the overarching approach to curriculum development, this course will focus on designing, implementing, and evaluating appropriate activities and environments for children in preschool and kindergarten with a focus on blocks, math, science, woodworking, and technology with literacy and art concepts integrated into each area. Emphasis will be on the concrete, practical application of philosophies, theories, and current research that is manifested in curriculum models in early childhood education. Students will dialogue and reflect together as they explore the cycle of inquiry and project work for developing, implementing and assessing curriculum. Emphasis will be on planning stimulating, age-appropriate classroom and outdoor learning environments that encourage child-initiated discovery and act as a tool in behavior management. These environments will be child and family friendly, barrier-free, and inclusionary and meet state regulatory requirements. Students will learn about and apply successful attributes of documentation panels that make children’s learning visible. Service learning is a component of this course. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 155C              Using Children’s Literature to Support Young Children’s Language and Literacy Development

High-quality children’s books will be used as a vehicle for supporting and applying current research on the acquisition of language and reading. This course will provide an overview of exemplary authors and illustrators of children’s literature from birth to age 8. Students will become familiar with Caldecott Award-winning books and the artistic techniques used to create these books. Big books will be introduced as a way of distinguishing features of print. Poetry, multicultural books, and bibliotherapy as applied to early childhood education will be studied. Students will learn how to use children’s literature to highlight the literacy elements of characterization, plot, setting, and theme. They will learn how to teach domains of language (phonology, semantics, syntax, morphology, and pragmatics) through shared storybook reading. Additionally, students will explore the teacher’s role in promoting family literacy and participate in service learning on this topic. Service learning is a component of this course. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 167C              Positive Behavior Guidance and Supporting Young Children with Challenging Behaviors

Through exploring theories of behavior management and functions of behavior, the role of positive behavioral supports in preparing young children to become competent and cooperative individuals with a strong social and emotional foundation will be emphasized. Developmentally appropriate methods of guiding individual and group needs will be shared as approaches to preventing disruptive behaviors in the classroom. Techniques for

dealing with more challenging and explosive behaviors using functional assessment, identifying replacement skills, and creating and implementing behavior intervention plans will be utilized. Partnering with families in developing these plans will be emphasized. Students will also learn about triggers of and interventions for the cycle of tantrums, meltdowns, and rage often experienced by children with autism spectrum disorder. Students will leave the course with tools for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of challenging behaviors. They will understand when and how to reach out for support in the community in dealing with issues beyond their expertise. Students will be able to use the class as a model for developing parent education programs for the families that they serve. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students. (Prerequisite: ECE 101C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 188C              Health, Safety, and Nutrition in Early Childhood Education

Offers an introduction to major issues affecting the health and safety of young children in early childhood settings. Nutrition and policy considerations about pediatric medications, infectious disease control, sick child care, universal precautions and liability, and health record-keeping will be discussed. Childhood stress and education for the prevention of child sexual abuse will be highlighted. Students will learn how to integrate curriculum for young children related to health, safety, and nutrition into the overall program. Service learning is a component of this course. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 195C              Child and Family Study Practicum I

The student will work in an approved human service setting under the supervision of an approved professional. Periodic conferences between the supervisor and practicum coordinator are planned to evaluate the student’s progress. At the close of the semester, the student will submit documentation of the practicum activities/experience and demonstrate the ability to relate theory to practice in the chosen field of experience. The student will complete a total of 125 hours of field experience. (Prerequisites: HSV 111C, HSV 242C, MHTH 187C, PSYC 105C, and PYSC 283C, each with a grade of C or higher, and permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 215C              Infant/Toddler Development and Programming

A study of important influences on infant and toddler development supported by research on brain development during the first three years of life. Emphasis will be put on the role and responsibilities of families, child care teachers, and specialists in creating high quality supportive environments. Sensitivity to attachment and the importance of observation and communication skills to nurture positive family, caregiver, and child relationships through the roles of primary caregiving, transitions, and continuity of care will be highlighted as students learn to design responsive programs for infants and toddlers and their families. Field work in an infant or toddler classroom is required as part of this class. A $25 NHTI ECE Lab fee will be assessed for all students. (Prerequisite: ECE 101C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 3

ECE 225C              Autism Spectrum Disorder

Examines the neurological underpinnings and behavioral characteristics of children from birth to age 8 with autism spectrum disorders. It will focus on an overview of the strengths and challenges of child-centered, developmental, research-based interventions to be used in natural environments. The centrality of the family will be emphasized. Students will shadow an interventionist working with a young child with autism for a minimum of 10 hours over the course of the semester. (Prerequisite: ECE 101C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 242C              Child, Family, and Community

Provides an overview of families and family systems (including Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological Theory) with emphasis on developing effective models of teacher/program/family partnerships. Students will identify their own biases as a precursor to exploring issues of power and privilege in society. Cultural dilemmas and their impact on early care and education will be identified as students begin to evaluate their own cultural competence. Students will learn how to identify and strengthen protective factors that empower families and reduce the risk of child abuse. Students will research various crises encountered by families and identify an action

plan to positively address the crisis. Community resources will be identified and involved. Service learning is a component of this course. (Prerequisite: ECE 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 261C              Family Child Care Business Management

This course will review the fundamentals of sound business practices as they relate to the running of a successful family child care business. Emphasis will be on designing of business plans, budgeting, insurance, effective business policies, contracts, pricing, marketing, customer relations, purchasing, financial, legal and licensing regulations and reports, small business management, and related record keeping.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 262C              Leadership and Administration of Child Care Programs

A survey of organization and management of early childhood programs and/or child care centers for the practicing professional. Emphasis will be on learning how to plan, organize, manage, and evaluate programs and facilities for children. Specific skills addressed are licensing procedures, hiring, motivating, and evaluating staff and parent involvement. Financial record-keeping to inform program management decisions will be based on an understanding of Excel computer program use. Leadership and visioning skills will also be taught and evidence of implementation will be required. Students will be required to spend 15 hours outside of class on a final project to be implemented in their professional work. This course will meet the requirements for director certification from the state of N.H. It will also meet the criteria for accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. (Prerequisite: permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 270C              Teaching Young Children with Exceptionalities

Broadens students’ awareness of the theoretical and legal foundations for programs serving young children (infancy through age 8) with a wide range of special educational needs. Students will examine the causes, symptoms, social consequences, and behavior characteristics of children with exceptionalities. Students will learn how to develop curriculum modification/accommodation strategies in all domains of development in an inclusive classroom setting or other natural environment. Emphasis will be on education for children and their families. Students will work with and observe a child and family to develop an understanding of their needs and develop a resource file of state, local, and national supports. Service learning is a component of this course. (Prerequisite: ECE 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECE 275C              Practicum 1 – Observation, Interpretation, Assessment, and Portfolio Documentation

Students will work in NHTI-approved Early Childhood Education settings for children in infant/toddler care, preschool, or kindergarten under the supervision of early childhood cooperating teachers. Students will conduct an in-depth child study over the course of the 105 hours that they will spend at their practicum site during the semester. They will become “students of childhood” as they learn how to interpret and assess their observations of children in the seminar class. Students will create and manage a portfolio for a child. They will use portfolio information to generate invitations to learning and implement child-centered curriculum. They will make children’s learning visible through learning story documentations and incorporate their own wonderings as teachers. Their observations will be summarized in narratives outlining the children’s growth in the various developmental domains. All of this will be used to plan and carry out two parent conferences. Video-capturing of practicum students in the action of teaching will be required. NHTI ECE faculty schedule site visits to review and evaluate student progress during the practicum experience. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to move on to ECE 276C. (Prerequisites: all 100-level ECE courses, a 2.5 minimum GPA in major field courses, permission of the ECE practicum coordinator, and submission of all required documents;  ECE 155C may be taken concurrently)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 7    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 276C              Practicum 2 – Exploring Teaching: Implementing Responsive Emergent Curriculum

Students will work in NHTI-approved Early Childhood Education (ECE) settings for children in infant/toddler care, preschool, or kindergarten under the supervision of early childhood cooperating teachers. Weekly seminars conducted by NHTI faculty offer support for students as they explore the characteristics of responsive

child-centered emergent curriculum projects. Students will document and reflect on their experiences with children, families, and professional partners through projects as they develop a project history book connecting theory to practice. Students will also be encouraged to develop and embrace the dispositions of wonder, disequilibrium, and reflective practice as they experience the role of “teacher as researcher” through the process of action research. The 105 hours they spend at their sites over the course of the semester will include lead teaching responsibilities and will require flexibility in scheduling to allow for two full days at the site. Video-captures of the practicum students in the action of teaching will be required. NHTI ECE faculty schedule site visits to review and evaluate student progress during their practicum experience. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to graduate from the ECE program. Service learning is a component of this course. (Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in ECE 275C; permission of the ECE practicum coordinator, and submission of all required documents; ECE 242C, ECE 270C and ECE 290C may be taken concurrently)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 7    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 282C              Preschool Special Education Practicum

Students will work in NHTI-approved community based settings with preschool children with special needs under the supervision of cooperating teachers. Students will become “students of childhood” as they conduct in-depth observations of preschoolers with special needs using a variety of tools during the 105 hours they spend at their practicum site this semester. Students will create and manage portfolios for children and use this information to write progress notes and narrative summaries. They will participate in IEP meetings and suggest and implement appropriate activity based interventions that are part of a child’s IEP. NHTI program faculty schedule site visits to review and evaluate student progress during the practicum experience. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to graduate from the degree program. (Prerequisites: all first year courses, 2.5 GPA in major field courses, permission of the practicum coordinator, and submission of all required documents)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 7    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 283C              Early Intervention Practicum

This 105-hour field based experience provides students with a supervised opportunity to develop skills and demonstrate competencies necessary in early intervention in natural settings (child care, homes, public schools). Students will learn how to best support families and caregivers. supervisors will provide guidance and support needed to enhance students’ development as early intervention paraeducators. Students will use appropriate assistive technologies and learn how to create a supportive environment for children learning to use these technologies. Through participation in an IFSP or IEP team, students will learn how to partner with families in the education of their children. (Prerequisites: all other courses in either the Young Children with Autism and Exceptionalities Certificate or first year courses in the Early Care and Education for Young Children with Disabilities Degree with a GPA of 2.5 or higher in major field courses; students must pass ECE 283C with a grade of C or higher to graduate from the corresponding program)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 7    Credit Hours: 4

ECE 290C              Early Childhood Leadership Seminar

This course explores the role of the early childhood professional in the workplace. Topics to be discussed include leadership, working in a team, and professional ethics. Students will develop a resume and create a professional portfolio that can be used for interview purposes. Emphasis will be placed on the role of ongoing professional development activities and involvement in the early childhood field through participation in varying boards and meetings around topics specific to the field. In lieu of textbook fees, students should plan on paying for, traveling to, and attending the state AEYC conference on a Saturday in Spring. (Prerequisites for ECE students: all 100-level ECE courses, ECE 275C; may be taken concurrently with ECE 242C, ECE 276C, and ECE 270C; for EYCD students: all 100-level courses, ECE 282C; may be taken concurrently with ECE 215C, ECE 242C, and ECE 283C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ECE 298C              Child and Family Study Practicum II

The student will continue field experience work in an approved human service setting under the supervision of an approved professional. Skills, knowledge, and personal characteristics are built on and integrated into the learning and supervision of this course, as well as second year coursework including criminology and elective options that fit the students field work. Periodic conferences between the supervisor and practicum coordinator are planned to evaluate the student’s progress. At the close of the semester, the student will submit documentation of the practicum activities/experience and demonstrate the ability to relate theory to practice in the chosen field of experience. The student will complete a total of 125 hours of field experience. (Prerequisites: HSV 195C and HSV 111C, HSV 242C, MHTH 187C, PSYC 105C, and PYSC 283C, each with a grade of C or higher, and permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

ECON 101C                  Macroeconomics

Concerned with the behavior of the economy as a whole, particularly fluctuations in economic activities. Basic elements of economic reasoning are applied to the public policy issues of unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. A brief survey of the history of economic ideas is followed by a study of the consequences for national policy of the changing institutional structure of the U.S. economy and of the conflicts inherent in, and generated by, competition and private enterprise. Analytic tools are used to evaluate monetary and fiscal policies and to understand current macroeconomic controversies.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ECON 102C                  Microeconomics

An investigation into the functioning and politics of the U.S. economy from the vantage of the marketplace, emphasizing microeconomics, wage bargaining, taxation, and the distribution of wealth and income. Topics include the theories of demand and production and the determination of prices and quantities for commodities and factors of production in competitive and noncompetitive markets.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 70C – TECP 92C are professional preparation courses for Teacher Education Conversion Program (TECP) candidates only.

EDU 101C/TECP 50C                  Introduction to Exceptionalities

Introduces the exceptionalities and related topics in the field of special education including definitions, prevalence, assessment, and intervention. It includes discussion of strategies for facilitating students’ independence, learning, social connections, and self-advocacy skills. Curriculum emphasizes the philosophical and practical applications of valuing students’ abilities and diversity and collaborating with educators and families. It will explore curriculum modifications and accommodations, problem-solving strategies, and transition issues. Ten hours of field work are required in this course. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 3

EDU 104C/TECP 51C                  Foundations of Education

Investigates the philosophical, historical, and social/cultural character of education in the U.S. It is intended to be an examination of how schools function organizationally. Discussions will include the role of education, system philosophy, and trends that have shaped contemporary education; field observations are included. This course is a concentration requirement for both Special Education and Education Associate Degree programs. It is intended to be the first in a series of learning experiences for those interested in careers as teachers. Ten hours of classroom observation required. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 200C/TECP 60C                  Supporting Students with Challenging Behaviors

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary for supporting students with challenging behaviors in various learning environments, using the framework of positive behavioral supports. Students will gain knowledge of the basic assumptions about the context, function, and role of behavior. Students will learn to use a variety of positive behavior intervention techniques to control targeted behavior, support learning, and maintain the attention of students. Ten hours of field observation required. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 3

EDU 201C/TECP 61C                  Legal and Ethical Issues in Education

Predicated on legislative requirements such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, this course considers theories and issues in the context of inclusive instructional settings. Students will develop an understanding of the various legal and ethical requirements as well as effective instructional strategies for curriculum adaptation and delivery within the context of federal and N.H. state special education and education laws and procedures. (Prerequisite: EDU 104C/TECP51C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 203C/TECP 62C                  Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learners

Focuses on practical instructional strategies for designing developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences based on the unique needs of individual learners. Students use differentiated instruction and universal design for learning as frameworks for designing lessons that meet the needs of diverse learners. Methods for adapting instruction and supporting students through modifications, accommodations, and assistive technology are explored. Students will collect a repertoire of evidence-based strategies for identifying and addressing the reading, writing, math, and study skills of students with disabilities. Through field experience, students have the opportunity to observe in the classroom and gain practical experience planning, delivering, adapting, and reflecting on a series of individualized lessons. Ten hours of field work are required. Ten hours of field observation required. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 204C/TECP 63C                  Instructional Technology

Presents the theory and strategies for effective integration of technology resources and technology-based methods of instruction and assistive technology designed for students with disabilities. A background of mediated instruction will be provided along with a review of the qualities and benefits of technology options, including assistive technology, available to instructional settings. Opportunities to apply instructional delivery using common forms of media, multimedia, computers, and specialized programs for students with disabilities will be integral to this course, in addition to contemplation of future issues of integration of technology and matters of time and place of the learning experience. (Prerequisite: EDU 104C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 208C/TECP 68C                  Content Literacy

Focuses on methods for integrating explicit instruction of effective reading comprehension strategies into content area teaching. Before, during, and after reading strategies that will help students to comprehend challenging content area reading material will be introduced and practiced. Mentor texts will be used to demonstrate text structure and make the connection between reading and writing in the content areas. Students will learn strategies for motivating and engaging students with reading, modeling effective reading and writing strategies, guiding comprehension, facilitating metacognitive discussions, and teaching vocabulary and study skills. Methods for assessing and developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking will be explored. Methods for differentiating and accommodating for struggling readers and writers including the use of assistive technology will also be explored. (Prerequisites: EDU 104C/TECP 51C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 209C/TECP 66C                  Curriculum and Assessment

Focuses on designing appropriately challenging learning experiences based on curriculum standards and individual needs. Students will learn strategies for direct and indirect instruction, supporting self-directed and collaborative learning, and promoting critical thinking and problem solving through questioning. Classroom management strategies that promote student engagement and a positive learning climate will be explored. Students will learn how to select, design, conduct, interpret, and use the results of formative and summative assessments. Use of the common core state standards in the planning, instruction, and evaluation process will be examined. 10 hours of classroom observation are required. (Prerequisites: EDU 104C/TECP 51C or EDU 101C/TECP 50C or permission of the department chair) A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

EDU 210C/TECP 69C                  Cross-Cultural Education Seminar

Offers candidates a professional forum for researching, reviewing, and discussing socio-cultural contexts and topics in language teaching and education. In the course candidates will develop a broad-based understanding of cross-cultural education and discover appropriate practices and techniques for the multi-cultural classroom. The course is a requirement for all education and TECP candidates.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 2

EDU 211C/TECP 67C                  Reading and Language Development

Focuses on assessing and addressing student literacy skills. Students will learn about the language development process and demonstrate their ability to use a variety of assessments to identify the language skills and needs of individual learners. Using data driven, collaborative decision making, students will plan appropriate interventions. Research-based methods for teaching phonics, vocabulary, spelling, fluency, reading comprehension, and writing will be explored. Students will learn how to guide readers and writers in developing effective strategies for reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Authentic, evidence-based, differentiated instruction linked to the common core standards will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: EDU 104C/TECP 51C)

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 220C                  Field Experience in Education

Practical experience in a learning environment. The student spends a minimum of 45 hours per semester in a supervised assigned learning environment and participates in a weekly seminar. In the instructional environment, students will work with individuals and groups and develop and deliver an instructional unit. This is a concentration requirement for the Associate in Science in Education program. (Prerequisites: interview and permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 6    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 222C/TECP 87C                  Language, Reading, and Literacy in ESOL

Designed to assist student educators in constructing a favorable learning environment for their English language learners with regard to reading and literacy in the content area. Appropriate literacy strategies, instruction and assessments will be evaluated, and various aspects of first and second language acquisition will be examined. All aspects of second language development will be considered such as phonemic awareness, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing. Approaches for assisting young and older learners with reading comprehension will be addressed, and students will learn to adjust language instruction to meet the developmental literacy needs of the language learners from various socio-cultural, educational, and linguistic backgrounds. Students will have weekly opportunities to work as one-on-one content tutors with English language learning needs to develop an understanding of language-learning needs and to increase educator effectiveness in improving student skills. Assessing and tracking English language learner progress will be explored. There will be a 20-hour service learning component wherein students will support ESOL learners and their community. This course is required for those in the TECP: ESOL Certification programs. Others must have permission from the TECP director or the director of cross-cultural education. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 223C                  Instructional Approaches in ESOL Tutoring

Focuses on the development of the knowledge and skills needed in tutoring ESOL learners. Includes useful techniques in the field, including the strategies for tutoring learners in developing reading comprehension skills. Through interactive instruction, group discussions, and practical activities, students will demonstrate a clear understanding of their role as educational supporters of ESOL teachers and language tutors in assisting ESOL learners with school work, cultural transition, and social interaction. This course includes a minimum of 45 hours of practicum, which provides the opportunity to apply the techniques learned in class. (Prerequisite: EDU 101C or EDU 104C and/or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 3

EDU 230C                 Essentials of Career and Technical Curriculum and Instruction

Explores the history, philosophy, principles, organization, and operation of career and technical education in the U.S. Students will develop a functional understanding of the role and responsibilities of a professional career and technical educator. This course will provide the participant with the foundation and skills needed to design, implement, and manage a curriculum in career and technical education. Identification of resources and occupational analysis, derivation of content, formulation of objectives, defining measurable learning outcomes, and the selection and development of activities and evaluation methods will be explored.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 70C                  Special Education Assessment

Prepares pre-service and in-service teachers to assess the achievement of students with special needs. It examines various assessment strategies. It includes the examination of the N.H. state curriculum frameworks, N.H. rules for students with disabilities, IDEIA regulations, and informal and formal assessment methods. Students will apply the assessment techniques in a case study format. They will utilize the assessment results to implement successful teaching/learning strategies in education settings for students with disabilities. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program or approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 71C                  Consultation/Collaboration and Individual Education Plans

An examination of the collaborative/consultative model in education and the skills necessary for that approach. It focuses on the state curriculum frameworks, the N.H. state rules for students with disabilities, and federal and local guidelines regarding the education of students with special needs. This course includes examination of the concepts and skills necessary for IEP and team development such as, the development of student profiles, goals, objectives, communication and collaboration skills, leadership skills, and knowledge of the theories of change. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program, EDU 101C, EDU 200C, EDU 203C and/or approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 73C                  Field Experience in Education

Provides opportunities for the practical application of teaching skills and dispositions. Observation, analysis, and guided interaction of the teaching/learning experience within elementary, middle, and/or secondary or post-secondary educational settings. Students are assigned to observe and perform specific teaching duties within a variety educational settings. Psychological, philosophical, and historic educational theories are analyzed in light of current best practice as they occur in contemporary educational environments. Students are required to complete 60 hours of assigned field work during the semester. (Prerequisites: interview and permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 12    Credit Hours: 5

TECP 80C                  Methods/Student Teaching for Middle/Secondary School Mathematics

Prepares prospective teachers with the methods for teaching mathematics at the middle/secondary school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in student teaching placement. This course requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practice for successful teaching. Supervision is provided a by college supervisor and a field-based professional. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Mathematics 5-8 and Secondary Mathematics 7-12 and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: permission of TECP Director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 30    Credit Hours: 12

TECP 81C                  Methods/Student Teaching for Middle/Secondary School Science Teachers

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching science at the middle/secondary school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the student teaching placement. This course also requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics, and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: completion of previous coursework in TECP and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 30    Credit Hours: 12

TECP 82C                  Methods and Practicum in General Special Education

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching in general special education K-12. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the student teaching placement. This course also requires a semester-long placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended general special education area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. Students document a minimum of 300 hours of work in the schools, including referral, observations, teaching, assessment, remediation, aiding with transition issues, IEP development and implementation, consultation, collaboration, and designing and implementing behavioral programs. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program, completion of previous general special education coursework, acceptance into student teaching, and approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 83C                  Methods and Student Teaching in General Special Education

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching in general special education K-12. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the student teaching placement. This course also requires a full time, semester-long placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended general special education area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. Students document the hours of work in the schools, including referral, observations, teaching, assessment, remediation, aiding with transition issues, IEP development and implementation, consultation, collaboration, and designing and implementing behavioral programs. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program, completion of previous general special education coursework, acceptance into student teaching, and approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 30    Credit Hours: 12

TECP 84C Practicum and Methods for Teaching Middle/Secondary School Mathematics

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching mathematics at the middle/secondary school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the teaching placement. This course also requires placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Mathematics grades 5-8 and mathematics grades 7-12 and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: completion of previous coursework in TECP and permission of TECP director.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 85C                  Practicum and Methods of Teaching Middle/Secondary School Science

Prepare prospective teachers for teaching science at the middle/secondary school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the teaching placement. This course also requires placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Life Sciences, Chemistry, General Science, Earth/Space Science, Physics and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: completion of previous coursework in TECP and permission of TECP director.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 86C/ENGL 286C                  Introduction to Linguistics

Focuses on linguistics, the scientific study of language. We will explore the properties of language and the linguistic challenges faced by English language learners. The course will expand on the subfields within linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, and semantics and pragmatics. Concepts relevant to teaching English will be taught: pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Language variation and written discourse will also be addressed as well as how to apply this knowledge to the English language classroom. Linguistic principles and features of both English and other languages will be examined to promote familiarity with the language experiences of English language learners. A native speaker of a world language will act as a “grammar text” as we decipher an unknown grammar in a field methods format. This course is required for those in the TECP: ESOL certification program. (Prerequisites: ENGL 101C, minimum of B average)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 88C                  Curriculum and Design and Assessment in ESOL

Presents theories, tools, techniques, and materials in the development of curricula that address the language and content needs of English language learners. The methodology for teaching such learners will be covered as well as how to plan and implement an adapted or differentiated curriculum to meet student need. Strategies that promote student success such as scaffolding and that create an effective learning environment for both the language and content classroom with be examined. Additionally, students will work with authentic formal and informal pre- and post-instructional assessments and will explore methods by which language proficiency, acculturation, and content may be measured. Student will create, judge, and adapt their own assessment tools as questions regarding standardized assessments will be raised. Appropriate testing accommodations for English language learners will also be considered. The role the N.H. Department of Education plays in ensuring that schools maintain legal compliance and equitable, accessible education for English language learners will be discussed as well as the rights and responsibility of NHTI’s ESOL programs under Title III funding and No Child Left Behind. The state’s K-12 language placement screening, W-APTTM, and its proficiency test, ACCESS for ELLS®, as well as how the ESOL teacher becomes a certified W-APTTM or ACCESS for ELLs® test administrator will be outlined. The state’s adoptions of WIDE® English Language Proficiency Standards and its curriculum will be explored. This course is required for those in the TECP: ESOL certification program. Others must have permission from the director of TECP or the director of cross-cultural education. This course requires 10 hours of field work. A $25 fee will be assessed to all students to cover the cost of clinical practice.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

TECP 90C                  Supervised Student Teaching/Theory, Practice, and Methods/Materials in ESOL Education

Designed to integrate and apply previous course work in ESOL certification. Students document their work in the schools, including planning, teaching, and consultation and aiding with transition issues. Students assume the full range of teaching responsibilities while supervised in the field. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. This course also focuses on communicative interactions between and within different culture groups. We explore issues related both to effective cross-cultural communication and to miscommunication. An examination of how one’s own cultural values and norms affect and guide intercultural interactions will guide class discussions and projects. Concepts such as power distance, hierarchy, uncertainty avoidance, non-verbal communication, and other intercultural communicative features will be explored, and ethnocentrism, stereotyping, and other value-based judgments will be addressed. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the ESOL Conversion Program, completion of the pervious ESOL coursework and department chair approval. Candidates should hold a teaching certification.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 30    Credit Hours: 3

TECP 91C                  Practicum, Methods/Materials, and Culture in ESOL Education

Designed to integrate and apply previous course work in ESOL certification. Students document their work in the school, including planning, teaching, and consultation and aiding with transition issues. Students assume the full range of teaching responsibilities while supervised in the field. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. Students document a minimum of 300 practicum hours. This course also focuses on communicative interactions between and within different culture groups. We will explore issues related both to effective cross-cultural communication and to miscommunication. An examination of how one’s own cultural values and norms affect and guide intercultural interactions will guide class discussions and projects. Concepts such as power distance, hierarchy, uncertainty avoidance, non-verbal communication, and other intercultural communicative features will be explored, and ethnocentrism, stereotyping, and other value-based judgments will be addressed. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the ESOL Conversion Program, completion of the previous ESOL coursework and department chair approval. Candidates should hold a teaching certification.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 92C                  The Teaching Portfolio

Offered to continue to assist TECP candidates with their professional portfolio development. The portfolio is a program requirement for certification. In this course candidates will continue to add coursework and practicum (or student-teaching) evidence and reflections to the portfolio. Candidates will prepare their portfolio for review before application for certification. All coursework and practicum and student teaching work is aligned to N.H. state standards and TECP goals. Offered every semester. (Prerequisite: permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

TECP 93C                  Internship Clinical Practice I: Methods/Clinical Practice for Middle/Secondary School Science Teachers

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching science at the middle/secondary school level. Students take this course as a part of a two-semester sequence. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation. This course also requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: successful completion of previous coursework in TECP, internship interview, and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 94                  Internship Clinical Practice II: Methods/Clinical Practice for Middle/Secondary School Science Teachers

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching science at the middle/secondary school level. This is the second part of the clinical practice/internship experience for science certification. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the internship II placement. This course also requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: successful completion of previous coursework in TECP, including Internship I, an internship interview, and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 95                  Internship Clinical Practice I: Methods/Clinical Practice for Middle/Secondary School Mathematics Teachers

Prepares prospective teachers for teaching mathematics at the middle/secondary school level. Candidates take this course as a part of a two-semester sequence. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation. This course also requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Mathematics 5-8 and Mathematics 7-12 and the Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: successful completion of previous coursework in TECP, internship interview, and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 96                  Internship Clinical Practice II: Methods/Clinical Practice for Middle/Secondary School Mathematics Teachers

This is the second part of the clinical practice/internship experience for science certification. Candidates take this course as a part of a two-semester sequence after successful completion of Internship I. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the internship II placement. This course also requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Mathematics 5-8 and Mathematics 7-12 and the Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: successful completion of previous coursework in TECP, including internship I, internship interview, and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 97C                  Methods/Student Teaching for Computer Science K-12

Prepares prospective teachers with the methods for teaching Computer Science in K-12 schools. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in student teaching. This course requires a full-time placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended certification area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. Supervision is provided by a college supervisor and a field-based cooperating educator. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the following content areas: Computer Science K-12 (Ed 612.33) and Professional Education Standards (N.H. Standard Ed 610). (Prerequisite: interview and permission of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 30    Credit Hours: 12

TECP 98C                  Internship Clinical Practice I: Methods/Clinical Practice for Special Education

The first part in a two-part methods course sequence that prepares prospective teachers for special education teaching at K-12 school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the internship placement. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. This course also requires a full-time, semester-long placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended general special education area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. Candidates document the hours of work in the schools, including referral, observations, teaching, assessment, remediation, aiding with transition issues, IEP development and implementation, consultation, collaboration, and designing and implementing behavioral programs. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program, completion of previous general special education coursework, acceptance into internship, and approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

TECP 99C                  Internship Clinical Practice II: Methods/Clinical Practice for Special Education

The second part in a two-part methods course sequence that prepares prospective teachers for special education teaching at K-12 school level. Developmentally appropriate content, strategies, and methods of instruction will be discussed with emphasis on the implementation in the internship placement. Seminars meet weekly throughout the semester. This course requires a full-time, semester-long placement in an educational setting appropriate for the intended general special education area. Students work toward mastery of attitudes, techniques, and professional practices for successful teaching. A college supervisor and a field-based professional provide supervision. Candidates document the hours of work in the schools, including referral, observations, teaching, assessment, remediation, aiding with transition issues, IEP development and implementation, consultation, collaboration, and designing and implementing behavioral programs. This course addresses specific N.H. state standards for certification in the area of general special education. (Prerequisites: acceptance in the General Special Education Conversion program, completion of previous general special education coursework, acceptance into internship, completion of Internship I and approval of TECP director)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 15    Credit Hours: 7

Students must earn a grade of C- or higher in each CPET and ELET course listed as a prerequisite to a subsequent CPET course.

ELET 101C            Electric Circuits

Covers basic electric circuit theory, the nature of electricity, resistance, current and voltage. Detailed coverage of topics includes direct current, alternating current, Ohm’s law, series circuits, parallel circuits, and energy and power relationships. This course also covers DC circuit analysis techniques including mesh and nodal analysis, and network theorems such as Norton’s, Thevenin’s, and maximum power transfer. The transient response of capacitors and inductors are discussed when a DC voltage is applied using the circuit and analysis techniques. Additional topics include the discussion of alternating waveform characteristics and analysis of sinusoidal alternating waveforms. Lab experiments are designed to reinforce the classroom work. It is strongly recommend that students have previously taken or are concurrently taking ELET 115C. (Corequisite: MATH 124C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 102C            Circuit Analysis

A continuation of ELET 101C; covers AC circuit analysis techniques including mesh and nodal analysis, and network theorems such as Norton’s, Thevenin’s, and maximum power transfer. Treatment is given to circuits containing dependent and independent sources of voltage and current. Resonance and basic filters are covered in detail as well as magnetism. Additional topics covered include transformers and three-phase circuits. Lab experiments are designed to reinforce the classroom work. (Prerequisites: ELET 101C, ENGL 101C, and MATH 124C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 110C            Electronics I

This is a study of the physical behavior of electronic devices. Emphasis is on analysis and application of electronic circuits utilizing semiconductor diodes, operational amplifiers, and transistors. Topics covered include rectification, clipping and clamping circuits, regulated power supplies, basic op-amps, biasing of transistors, and simplified AC modeling of transistor circuits. Engineering design automation tools are used to reinforce the theory through electronic analysis simulations. Lab experimentation reinforces classroom theory with practical work. (Prerequisites: ELET 101C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 115C            Digital Fundamentals

Open to all majors; designed for students with little or no electronics skills. Topics covered include basic logic gates; base 2, 10, and 16 number systems; BCD, Gray and ASCII codes, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, flip-flops, counters, programmable logic devices, and other related digital devices. Hands-on lab experiments are an integral part of this course. The labs demonstrate real-world implementation of otherwise abstract academic concepts and provide valuable experience in breadboarding, testing, and debugging circuits. (Prerequisite: Algebra I or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 2

ELET 144C            Embedded Microsystems

Personal computers are used to host an integrated hardware/software development system for applications with embedded Microcontrollers. A system-level approach to the specification, decomposition, hardware/software development, and system integration for the implementation of embedded systems is covered through lecture and lab experiments. Topics covered include microprocessor architecture, instruction sets, interfacing, and real-time programming techniques in assembly language. Lab exercises consist of system-level development in serial and parallel data transfer, data acquisition, and analog input and output signal processing. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C, ELET 101C and ELET 115C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 210C           Electronics II

A continuation of ELET 110C covering more advanced electronics topics with a variety of applications. The non-ideal characteristics of op-amps and other electronic devices will be discussed with applications emphasizing offset, gain, and linearity. Other topics may include but are not limited to sensors, pulse width modulations, Bode plots, SCRs, TRIACs, and optoelectronics. EDA tools are used to reinforce the theory with electronic analysis simulations. (Prerequisites: ELET 110C; corequisite: ELET 102C or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 215C            Advanced Digital Electronics

Advanced topics in digital electronics including the internal structure of logic families, complex digital circuits, synchronous logic, A/D and D/A conversion, timing diagrams, computer bus systems, programmable logic devices (PLD), and complex circuit debugging. The topic of digital interfacing is also covered. This includes interfacing various logic families to each other as well as interfacing logic to various I/O loads, such as inductive loads and 120VAC loads. (Prerequisites: CPET 107C, ELET 110C, ELET 115C, and ELET 144C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 251C            Advanced Topics in Electronics

Introduces students to advanced applications in electronics. Topics covered include but are not limited to an introduction to electronic communication theory including digital communications, fiber optics, programmable logic controllers, and human-machine interface. Lab exercises are used to reinforce classroom theory. (Prerequisite: ELET 115C, ELET 144C, and ELET 210C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 4

ELET 305C            Design Project Preparation

Contains the background material and preparation necessary for ELET 306C and consists of three integrated learning objectives, which are studied concurrently. Objective one will be to document, design, and build a team project that will use a typical industry project management process to complete a project assigned by the instructor. Product design documents will be created to guide this objective. Objective two covers the mechanics of designing and fabricating printed circuit boards. This includes the use of EDA tools. The tools used include but are not limited to schematic capture and printed circuit board layout. Printed circuit boards will be fabricated that encompass both traditional through-hole components and modern surface-mount technologies. An overview of industry standards of workmanship and safety are included. In objective three, the student selects a senior project to be completed in ELET 306C, obtains approval for that project, and develops a detailed project definition. Much latitude is given in selecting a project. Projects may be undertaken individually or as teams. They may be internal or collaborative with industry. The project may involve developing a specific circuit or a more general exposure in an appropriate industrial environment. Ultimately, the project must meet the requirements outlined in EL 306 and receive final approval from the instructor. The definition will serve as a guideline for the next phase of the senior project. (Prerequisites: ELET 102C, ELET 110C, ELET 115C, and ENGL 125C or ENGL 120C; corequisite: ELET 144C, and ELET 210C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 5    Credit Hours: 3

ELET 306C            Senior Design Project

The culmination of two years of theoretical study in the electronics engineering field; is intended to exercise and enhance the student’s practical competency in that field. When combined with its preparation course (ELET 305C), it prepares each student to each student be involved with design, development, implementation, and testing of a curriculum-related design as required by the project definition developed by the student in ELET 305C. An accurate record of time invested is to be kept, all work is to be documented in a logbook, and regular progress reports are to be submitted. As the project nears completion, a technical write-up will be required as well as a formal presentation of the project. (Prerequisite: ELET 305C, ELET 144C, ELET 210C; corequisites: ELET 215C; or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 5    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 099C                 Developmental Reading and English

Integrates developmental English and reading. The course is rooted in research and theory that allows students to be immersed in foundational literacy skills needed for successful progress in college-level courses as well as future integration into their chosen career path. The course is designed for students with mid- to upper-level developmental skills who may benefit from an intensive skill-building curriculum that targets English and reading skills. This course also requires corequisite academic supports. The focus of the course will be on reading and writing skill practice, application, and integration across the disciplines at the college-level. Students will be expected to successfully demonstrate and apply appropriate college-level reading skills and writing skills to a variety of assignments and assessments. Proficiencies in strategic and contextualized reading and writing skills will be developed. Topics in reading and writing skill practice, application, and integration include the reading and writing process, critical thinking strategies, active reading strategies, and well-developed paragraph construction. (Institutional credit only; permission of the department chair required)

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 100C                 Introductory English

Prepares students for success in ANGL 101C through active reading and critical thinking, practice with the stages of the writing process (including prewriting, drafting, organization, development, coherence, and editing), and work with grammatical concepts that affect clarity and style. The four institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. Students are expected to receive a grade of C or higher in ENGL 100C to advance to ENGL 101C.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 101C                 English Composition

Required of all first-year students and designed to teach students to write clear, vigorous prose, this course takes students through all stages of the writing process. Essay topics range from personal narratives to logical arguments. All students learn the resources of the NHTI library and write at least one documented research paper. Available in honors format. Students who have received credit for ENGL 101C cannot also receive credit for ENGL 101FC, ENGL 101XC, GST 100C, or GST 102C.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 101FC                 English Composition—FYE

Meets the same objectives as ENGL 101C and embeds topics typically covered in a first-year experience course such as career and major research, priority management, and study skills such as note-taking, test-taking, and critical thinking. Students who have received credit for ENGL 101FC cannot also receive credit for ENGL 101C, ENGL 101XC, GST 100C, or GST 102C. (Prerequisite: Placement testing or ENGL 100C; permission of academic advisor)

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 101MC                 English Composition: Mindful

Designed to teach students to write clear, vigorous prose. This course takes students through all stages of the writing process. Essay topics range from personal narratives to logical arguments. All students learn the resources of the NHTI library and write at least one documented research paper. Features the study of mindfulness and incorporates mindfulness meditation as an instructional method while exploring aspects of emotional intelligence as they relate to effective communication. Students who have received credit for ENGL 101MC cannot also receive credit for ENGL 101C, ENGL 101FC, and ENGL 101XC.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 4

ENGL 101XC                 English Composition—Corequisite

Designed for students who need practice in foundational skills while engaging college-level reading and writing skills. Weekly lab sessions will reinforce skills and topics directly related to lecture topics. The course takes students through all stages of the writing process. Essay topics range from personal narratives to logical arguments. All students learn the resources of the NHTI library and write at least one documented research paper. Students who have received credit for ENGL 101XC cannot also receive credit for ENGL 101C and ENGL 101FC.

Lecture Hours: 4    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 5

ENGL 102C                 Introduction to Literature

An introductory survey exposing the student to representative works from the major genre forms: fiction, poetry, and drama. Available in honors format. Students who have received credit for ENGL 102C cannot also receive credit for ENGL 102C-FYE and ENGL 102MC.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 102C-FYE                 Introduction to Literature: Hero’s Journey

Introduces students to representative works from major genres, such as fiction, poetry, and drama and the concept of the “hero’s journey.” Through reading, writing, discussion, and presentation students analyze texts to understand the role of literature in culture. Using the framework of the literature, students will examine and plan their own journey through college and beyond. Students who have received credit for ENGL 102C-FYE cannot also receive credit for ENGL 102C and ENGL 102MC. ENGL 101C recommended.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 102MC                 Introduction to Literature: Mindful

Introduces students to representative works from major genres such as fiction, poetry, and drama. Through reading, writing, and class discussion, students analyze texts to understand the role of literature in culture. ENGL102MC features the study of mindfulness and incorporates mindfulness meditation as an instructional method while also exploring aspects of emotional intelligence as they relate to effective communication. Students who have received credit for ENGL 102MC cannot also receive credit for ENGL 102C and ENGL 102C-FYE.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 110C/THTR 110C                 Introduction to the Theatre

Provides a broad survey of the basic components of theatre. Students study theatre from different perspectives. They examine plays, the history of theatre as an art, acting, technical theatre, theatre’s impact on society, and important practitioners in the field. Plays are unique in all of literature because they’re only finished in performance in front of an audience. To understand how plays come to their complete realization, the class will see several productions both on and off campus. The student will be responsible for the cost of one ticket for an off-campus production.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 120C                 Communications

Focuses on the application of communication principles and theories, enabling students to develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal, and nonverbal language and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes a variety of speeches, exercises, and writing assignments. Available in honors format.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 120MC                 Communication: Mindful

Focuses on the application of communication principles and theories. Students will develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal and nonverbal language, and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes speeches, exercises, and writing assignments. Sections identified as MC feature the study of mindfulness and incorporate mindfulness meditation as an instructional method while exploring aspects of contemplative neuroscience and emotional intelligence as they relate to effective communication.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 120WC                  Communications

Designed for students who intend to continue their education beyond NHTI. This course emphasizes writing and communication skills to help students succeed in upper-level college courses. This writing-intensive seminar puts equal emphasis on process and product, giving students the opportunity to develop metacognitive abilities and improve interpersonal communication skills. By focusing on the application of communication principles and theories, students will develop public speaking, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and group communication skills. Through an in-depth look at self-concept, verbal and nonverbal language, and listening skills, students gain an increased awareness of the way they perceive themselves and others as well as the cultural and ethical implications of behavior. Coursework includes speeches, exercises and writing assignments.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 121C                 Introduction to Film

The art, history, technology, and theory of the narrative motion picture from the silent period to the present.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 125C                 Communication and the Literature of Science and Technology

Built around the theme of science and technology, this course focuses on improving communication skills. Areas of study include critical reading, critical thinking, public speaking, interpersonal communication, and writing. Topics may vary and could include physical, technical, natural, health, and social sciences.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 135C                 Introduction to Media Studies

Focuses on the nature, development, and effects of various media in relation to culture and society. Students will gain an understanding of print and electronic media, public relations, advertising, media policy and law, global communications, and media ethics. Coursework includes presentations, exercises, and writing assignments. Successful completion of ENGL 101C strongly recommended. This course does not satisfy NHTI’s Humanities or English Literature requirements.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 150C                 Introduction to Drama

An introductory survey involving the study of drama as literature and performance beginning with the Greeks and continuing through Shakespeare to the present.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 160C                 Introduction to Poetry

Designed to make students aware of the aesthetic value of poetry and develop their critical skills as readers. Included is an in-depth study of the various genres and structural elements of poetry. Genres considered are sonnet, ode, elegy, ballad, epic, dramatic monologue, and open form. Structural elements surveyed include imagery, sound, rhythm, rhyme, tone, and diction.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 201C                 English Composition II

Aiming at higher levels of writing competencies, this class focuses on analysis, argument, and research. It addresses issues of style and structure, from the sentence level to the whole essay, and incorporates peer review and critique. Students are required to collect and evaluate information, to analyze subjects from a variety of critical perspectives, and to use logic to present and defend conclusions. Students compose essays of varying lengths, including shorter reflections and more sustained arguments. Individual instructors may offer the course based on a theme. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 210C                 British Literature I

Traces the development of British literature from the Middle Ages through the early eighteenth century and includes readings in poetry, fiction, essay, and drama. Authors’ works will be examined within the cultural, philosophical, and political climate in which they were created. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 211C                 British Literature II

This course traces the development of British literature from the late eighteenth century to the present. The poetry, fiction, essays, and dramas of several major authors of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods will be studied. Authors’ works will be examined within the cultural, philosophical, and political climate in which they were created. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 214C                 American Literature Survey I: to 1865

Traces American Literature to 1865. Students read representative major, as well as minor, writers from all literary periods and various movements. Readings are set in the cultural contexts in which they were created. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) Available in online format.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 215C                 American Literature Survey II: 1865 – present

Covers American literature from 1865 to the present. It is designed for English majors and others interested in the character and history of U.S. literature. Students read representative major, as well as minor, writers from various literary periods and movements. Readings will be set in an historical and cultural context. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221C                 Film Genres and Directors

Offers students an advanced, focused examination of the art, history, and theory of a body of narrative films, which may be related by genre, filmmaker, country, style, movement, theme, and/or culture and ideology. Uses viewing, lectures, and class discussion and emphasizes film theory, criticism, and history. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change, providing student earned a grade of C or better. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221AC                 Images of Light

Utilizing viewings, lectures, and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism, and history, this course explores the creative and dynamic interrelationships of filmmaking, particularly between the director and the director of photography between the vision of a film and its realization.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221BC                 Films of 1962

An examination of the year 1962 in film, arguably the best year in international filmmaking. Utilizing film viewing, lectures, projects, and discussions, the course will explore not only how and why international filmmaking reached its apogee in 1962 but also the lasting effects of these films and the filmmakers. Films screened include Jules et Jim; Eclipse; Through a Glass Darkly; Viridiana; Yojimbo; Last Year at Marienbad; Cleo From Five to Seven; Manchurian Candidate; To Kill a Mockingbird; Lolita; Ride the High Country; Miracle Worker; Man Who Shot Liberty Valance; and Lawrence of Arabia.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221CC                 American Independent Cinema

An independent film is one that has been funded independently of a major studio; typically the monies come from limited partnerships, personal loans, presales, private investors, or credit cards. The late 1980s and 1990s saw a tremendous emergence of U.S. independent cinema, as a variety of eccentric and challenging filmmakers and evolving film styles came to America. This course will focus on American independent film directors, the process of conception, funding to creation, and distribution of their initial film. With several directors we will explore their achievements and studio flops.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221DC                 The Modern Classics

Utilizing viewings, lectures, class discussions, presentations and emphasizing film theory, criticism, and history, this course explores the audacity, range, depth, and stylistic experimentation of the newest wave of filmmaking (the influences on films since the 1994 release of Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction) as seen through American and foreign films.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221EC                 German Expressionism

Utilizing viewings, lectures, and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism, and history, this course explores the creative and dynamic interrelationships in Germany of the Expressionist Film movement in the time between the two world wars as well as the reinterpretation of that period prior to reunification. Expressionism and Post-Expressionism as movements will be explored within the context of the times, concentrating on the intensity of the artist’s inner world capturing the nightmarish quality of artistic vision. Emphasis will be placed on the mood of Expressionism and how art anticipates history.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221FC                 American Cult Cinema

Allows the student to view, research, and discuss nearly two dozen motion pictures more or less widely regarded as “bad movies” in one or more ways. In seeking to determine intelligently what factors might contribute toward cinematic badness, students will consider subject matter, personal and societal prejudices, the effects of the passing of time, the effects of change, stigmatization of particular movie genres and/or directors and/or actors, and a wide variety of other aspects relating to viewer perception of a movie’s quality or lack thereof.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221GC                 Darkness and Light: Film Noir

Utilizing viewings, lectures, and class discussion and emphasizing film theory, criticism, and history, this course explores the origins of film noir and examines pre-noir films but also noir films of the classic period as well as those of the post-classic and modern periods.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221HC                 Alfred Hitchcock

An in-depth study of the film techniques and unique storytelling genius of Alfred Hitchcock, including an examination of the influences of other directors and cinematic movements on Hitchcock. This course will trace his career as the “master of suspense” from his early films in England to his American works and includes the star system, character development, storyboards, and the art of the action montage.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 221IC                 Stanley Kubrick

As a director known for controversial films such as Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, and A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick repeatedly bucked the Hollywood mainstream, emerging as an outsider who resisted the scrutiny of conventional film criticism and biography. This class will study in-depth the film techniques, influences of other directors and cinematic movements, and unique storytelling of Stanley Kubrick.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0     Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 227C          Professional Communication and Public Speaking

Focuses on the specific tools for communicating in complex, professional environments. Students will develop digital, social, and visual media skills; learn interpersonal, cultural, team, leadership, and ethical skills; learn a three-step process for composing business correspondence, letters, articles, e-mails, instant messages, blogs, tweets, and webpages; develop skills in researching, planning, and writing reports and proposals; write employment messages, letters, and resumes; develop and deliver oral presentations, a group presentation with a PowerPoint, and an impromptu speech; and develop questionnaires and conduct interviews. Successful completion of ENGL 101 strongly recommended. This course does not satisfy NHTI’s Humanities or English Literature requirements.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 240C                 Cultural Identity through Young Adult Fiction

Students will read, discuss, and evaluate a range of literature written for young adults (grades 8-12). This course will investigate the social and cultural norms presented to teens through the literature written for them. Students will consider whether YA literature is reflective of changing cultural norms or if the shifts in popular literature can shape the collective identity of a generation of teens. In addition to exploration of mass media spin-offs and popular literature fads, students will critically analyze the major contributing authors in modern YA literature and how the common themes teens deal with are handled by those authors. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 251C                 Contemporary Drama

A seminar focused on major European and American drama since the 19th century. Through reading, discussion, and lecture regarding the works of major writers, students are exposed to contemporary issues in the development of the dramatic art. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 255C                 Shakespeare

A study of representative works by William Shakespeare. Selections are chosen from histories, comedies, and tragedies. Students are introduced to the social and cultural characteristics of the Early Modern Period, the biography of the author, and various issues surrounding the life and works. No previous knowledge of Shakespeare is assumed. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 260C                 The Novel

A genre class designed for advanced students; selects from a wide range of representative texts in this essential literary form. Students will read approximately eight works of fiction. Selections may be drawn from any period of literature from the 18th-century origin of the form up to the present and may incorporate both texts written in English as well as English translations of non-English texts. Readings will be set in their historical and cultural contexts and will display the wide range of texts covered by the word Novel.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 272C                 Modern Short Fiction

A study of fiction focusing on elements and themes of the short story art form in stories written in the past 150 years. Through close reading, lectures, and discussions, stories are placed in the contexts of literary trends and periods. Biographical information may also be studied to gain a better understanding of the unique styles and perspectives of individual authors. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) 

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 285C                 Literature, Technology, and Culture

Examines the cultural implications of science and technology in the modern world. Students study a range of essays and fictional works in traditional literature, science, and science fiction, which may include such works as Frankenstein and Brave New World. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) 

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 286C/TECP 86C                 Introduction to Linguistics

Focuses on linguistics, the scientific study of language. Students explore the properties of language and linguistic challenges faced by English language learners. The course will expand on the subfields within the linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, and semantics and pragmatics. Concepts relevant to teaching English will be taught: pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Language variation and written discourse will also be addressed as well as how to apply this knowledge to the English language classroom. Linguistic principles and features of both English and other languages will be examined to promote familiarity with the language experiences of English language learners. A native speaker of a world language will act as a “grammar text” as we decipher an unknown grammar in a field methods format. This course is required for those in the TECP: ESOL Conversion program. Others must have permission from the director of TECP or the director of cross-cultural education. (Prerequisites: ENGL 101C, minimum of B average)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 287C                 Women in Literature

Images and roles of women in literature are traced from historical to contemporary times through a study of selected works in fiction, poetry and drama. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) 

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 291C                 Contemporary Issues and World Literature

An investigation of current and enduring issues through world literature. Emphasis on 20th century works, but works from other periods are also considered. Topics vary from year to year and with the instructor. See department for details of current offerings. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) Available in honors format.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0   Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 291AC                 Contemporary Latin American Literature

Images and examples of Latin American culture in literature are traced from historical to contemporary times with an emphasis on 20th century contemporary works through a study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film, and drama.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 291BC                 Contemporary Spanish Literature

Through a study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film, and drama, this course traces images and examples of Spanish culture and relevant issues through various landscapes, comparing current and post-war issues as well as literary conversations and connections to American and European literature. The emphasis is on contemporary works. It is available in an online format. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent, or permission of the department chair. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.) Students interested in an enrichment travel experience related to this course should contact the English department chair. The travel portion of this course is not required. Students should note that the cost of the trip to Barcelona is not included in the tuition for this course. Students are responsible for all costs of this trip.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 294MC                 Communicating Mindfully Capstone

Reviews and builds on key elements of mindful communication. Students will practice applying mindful communication skills in the workplace and reflect on those experiences to improve interactions with colleagues, customers, clients, and others. Students will work in groups in which each partner has a different major that the other (when possible). Through online discussion posts, students will practice mindful communication techniques to practice attending to others, confirming understanding, and providing feedback that is respectful, insightful, and useful in meeting their partner’s needs related to goals students have set while taking the prerequisite MC courses. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged and given the opportunity to engage in regular contemplative practices such as mindfulness meditation. (Prerequisites: ENGL 101MC, ENGL 102MC, and ENGL 120MC, or permission of the department chair; corequisite for IT majors only: IST 294C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ENGL 295C                 Creative Writing

Designed for writers interested in learning about creative writing. Students will present and critique their own original work and the work of their classmates as well as examine published works. Additionally, students will explore the various elements of drama, fiction, or poetry or mixed genre, depending on the focus of the specific course. Information on preparing a manuscript for submission and publication may also be included. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or permission of the instructor; an introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 295AC                 Creative Writing: Fiction

Designed for writers interested in learning more about the craft of fiction writing. Students will examine published short stories in the classic and contemporary canon as well as present and critique their own work and the work of others. Additionally, the students will explore some of the genres of fiction in more depth including science fiction and fantasy, mystery, and children’s books. Lectures on preparing a manuscript for submission and the publishing industry are included. Available in honors format. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or permission of instructor. Students who do not have the prerequisite may be asked to submit a writing sample. An introductory-level literature course is highly recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 295BC                 Creative Writing: Poetry

Designed for writers interested in learning about the craft of poetry writing. Students will present original work to their teacher and classmates for discussion and critique as well as examine published works. Additionally, the students will explore the various elements of poetry. Students will be expected to spend the majority of their time writing and revising original works. Information on preparing a manuscript for submission and publication may also be included. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or permission of the instructor; ENGL 102C or ENGL 160C is recommended.)

Lecture Hours: 3     Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 295CC                 Creative Writing—Nonfiction

Provides an introduction to the art and craft of writing creative nonfiction, an approach to “telling the truth” that many tools of fiction writing and journalism. Students will read, write, critique, and analyze pieces demonstrating the different styles in this genre: memoir, essay, and literary journalism. In addition, this course will include lectures, workshops, and peer editing. Students will experiment with the basic techniques of journalism, such as researching, reporting, and interviewing. The goal is to help students write stories that give meaning to experience, in a way that touches others. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or by permission of the instructor.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 295DC                 Playwriting

Illuminates and guides students through the art and craft of writing for performance. This course explores the fundamental principles needed to build a realistic play that is intended to be produced on the stage. Though the course is built around the construction of plays, the principles, writing exercises, readings, and other assignments serve as a solid base for any form of dialogue-driven writing. The class will culminate in the writing and staged-readings of 10-minute plays and performance texts. Students are expected to attend, at their own expense, one live theater production to be specified. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C with a grade of C or higher.) Students receiving credit for ENGL 295DC cannot also receive credit for THTR 120C.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 295EC                 Creative Writing: Young Adult Fiction

Designed for writers interested in learning more about the craft of writing fiction for young adults. Students will examine published short stories and novels in the classic and contemporary canon for readers ages 12-17, as well as present their own work and critique the work of others. Students will explore some of the subgenres of young adult fiction in more depth, including science fiction and fantasy, edge, and horror, and study how the major themes relevant to teen readers are addressed in those subgenres. Students may choose to work on a series of short stories or on a longer, novel-length piece. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C or equivalent with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENGL 298AC                 Contemporary Spanish Literature: Barcelona Travel Lab

Following the study of selected works in fiction, poetry, film and drama, this course explores through travel to Barcelona many of the places referenced in these works and provides a hands-on experience of Spanish culture. It is intended to reinforce and set the learning acquired in ENGL 291BC. (Prerequisite: ENGL 291BC with a grade of C or higher.) Students should note that the cost of the trip to Barcelona is not included in the tuition for this course. Students are responsible for all costs of this trip.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

ESOL 101C           Basic Writing

Focuses on developing writing skills at the paragraph level. Students will develop writing skills through a learning process that integrates reading, writing, and grammar practice. In learning and practicing a variety of writing tasks, students will gain increasing competence in expressing themselves in appropriate written English in an academic context. The developmental process also encourages cultural learning. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: Students must attain a minimum composite score of 55 on the MTELP. Completion of this course with a grade of C or better will satisfy the prerequisite for ESOL 201C.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 102C           Pronunciation Matters

The purpose of this course is to guide students into speaking clear and natural American English. It addresses basics in pronunciation for clear communication. Contents include sound/spelling patterns, syllables, consonant/vowel problems, linking, stress, and rhythm. The course will be a learner-centered, encouraging interactive activities and practice. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: Students must attain a minimum composite score of 55 on the MTELP. Completion of this course with a grade of C or better will satisfy the prerequisite for ESOL 202C.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 104C           American Culture I

Introduces and explores American culture through selected topics of interest. The course introduces typical American people, places, and ideas, providing students with essential information about the U.S. and stimulating cross-cultural exchange. This course emphasizes cultural awareness and addresses the four basic language skills – reading, writing, speaking, and listening. A variety of high-interest topics will enable students to take part in discussions, present short talks, solve problems, and interact with each other. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: Students must attain a minimum composite score of 55 on the MTELP. Completion of this course with a grade of C or better will satisfy the prerequisite for ESOL 204C.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 201C           Academic Writing

Prepares students for English composition and other academic writing at the college level. It focuses on developing writing skills at the essay level. Students will move from writing structured paragraphs to organizing,

drafting, and revising complete essays. Course content includes introduction to patterns of essay organization such as the comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and process analysis. Grammar and complex sentence structures will be reviewed as needed. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: ESOL 101C Basic Writing with a grade of C or better, or permission of the department chair of cross-cultural education as determined using the student’s score on the MTELP.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 202C           Clear Communication

Helps non-native speakers of English develop skills of oral communication and listening comprehension. Various pronunciation needs for communicating more effectively in academic or professional settings will also be addressed. The learner-centered instruction guides students in developing communicative English through interactive practices including stresses of words, intonations of sentences, and styles of communication. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: ESOL 102C with a grade of C or better, or permission of the department chair of cross-cultural education as determined using the student’s score on the MTELP.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 203C           Grammar Practice

Focuses on training students in developing proficiency through active grammar practice. Students will learn grammar structures through systematic themes as well as practical application through exercises. Reading and other communicative activities will be integrated. Grammar exercises will cover a broad content of both a scientific and humanistic nature as well as selections from TOEFL. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: ESOL 101C with a grade of C or better, or permission of the department chair of cross-cultural education as determined using the student’s score on the MTELP.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 204C           American Culture II

Expands the students’ knowledge of the American culture through selected topics of interest. The course not only provides students with essential information about the U.S. but also stimulates cross-cultural exchange. This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct research and then develop and deliver presentations to the class on their findings. Four language skills – reading, writing, speaking, and listening – are addressed in this course. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: ESOL 104C with a grade of C, or permission of the department chair of cross-cultural education as determined using the student’s score on the MTELP.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ESOL 205C           Reading Comprehension

Moves learners toward higher proficiency in reading comprehension and cultural literacy by investigating concepts and texts related to many fields of study to include business, science, psychology, politics, and technology. Classes will emphasize a developmental process that integrates reading comprehension, vocabulary expansion, problem solving, critical thinking, and cultural literacy. Readings from journals, newspapers, and works of fiction and non-fiction will be explored in this course. The three institutional credits awarded for this course do not count toward graduation requirements but are calculated into GPA. (Prerequisite: ESOL 101C or ESOL 104C with a grade of C or better, or permission of the department chair of cross-cultural education as determined using the student’s score on the MTELP.)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ENVS 101C                  Fundamentals of Environmental Science

Provides an introduction to the structure, function, and interactions of atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic systems, as well as the impact of the human population on such systems. Topics will include basic scientific

concepts and methods for understanding human population growth and their impact on the environment, including cycles of carbon, water, and other materials, weather and climate, and sustainability of natural resources, in particular water and energy. The course will evaluate natural environmental processes, as well as human impacts to these processes, using case studies and real data to demonstrate the role of science in solving pressing environmental problems. High school Biology and Chemistry are recommended.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

ENVS 220C                  Introduction to Soil Science

Introduces students to the study, management, and conservation of soils as natural bodies, both as a media for plant growth and as a part of a larger ecosystem. Students will learn to identify soil types in natural and disturbed communities. This course will present the concept of soil science such as composition, chemical, physical and biological properties, classification and mapping, soil water, soil conservation, management practices, and soil fertility and productivity. The world’s soils are being greatly impacted by environmental impacts such as climate change, water pollution, deforestation, and development. The quality of the soil determines the capacity of land to support natural ecosystems and human society. This course will provide an introduction to the soil types found in northern New England and how those soil types will determine our capacity to grow food.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

ENVS 250C                  Agroecology

Introduces the discipline of agroecology from an ecological perspective. An emphasis will be placed on relevant ecological theory within the context of production agriculture. Students will examine and measure the interactions between plants, animals, soil, and climate as well as the impact that human engagement has on these components. Students will research and present the history and consequences of modern industrial agricultural systems and the need for more sustainable management practices that consider ecological interactions. (Prerequisite: BIOL 111C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

ENVS 290C                  Senior Capstone Project and Seminar

Serves as the capstone course for the Environmental Sciences program, in which the student will demonstrate the application of the knowledge gained throughout the program. This will be achieved either by independent study investigating all sides of a current environmental issue selected by the student with guidance from his/her program advisor or through participation in a field internship with an approved industry partner. The student will submit a written paper and make an oral presentation to all interested students, faculty, and industry partners in a seminar format. (Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in all major field and other required science courses taken prior to the semester in which the student registers for this course and permission of the department chair. Prerequisites or corequisites: ARET 160C, GEOL 101C, PHIL 242C, BIOL 215C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 4

DANC 101C          Dance Survey I

Provides novice dancers with the fundamentals of strength and conditioning and an introduction to the basic dance genres of ballet, tap, jazz, and contemporary/lyrical. Pass/no pass grades only. Classes are held at the Concord Dance Academy. Students are required to wear dance-appropriate clothing.

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 5    Credit Hours: 2

DANC 102C          Dance Survey II

Builds on the fundamentals of strength and conditioning and the introduction to the basic dance genres of ballet, tap, jazz, and contemporary/lyrical presented in Dance Survey I. Pass/no pass grades only. Classes are held at the Concord Dance Academy. Students are required to wear dance-appropriate clothing. (Prerequisite: successful completion of Dance Survey I or placement audition)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 5     Credit Hours: 2

DANC 140C          Introduction to Modern Dance

Designed to guide students’ knowledge and awareness of the performing art form that is modern dance through the study of the history of modern dance via assigned readings and viewings of videotaped performances by various modern dance companies and through the physical development of a basic movement vocabulary, elementary dance technique, improvisation exploration, and composition. Students must wear fitted sweat pants, running pants, or shorts, and fitted T-shirts or a leotard with footless tights or other dance/exercise clothing during class sessions.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 4    Credit Hours: 3

DANC 141C          Ballet Fundamentals

Designed to guide students’ knowledge and awareness of the performing art form that is classical ballet through the following process: the study of the history of classical ballet by assigned reading, viewings of videotaped performances by various professional ballet companies, and by attending a live performance (which may require special travel and separate ticket purchase); it also includes the physical execution of basic ballet technique. Special attire: women must wear a leotard and tights or other dance/exercise clothing and ballet slippers; men must wear fitted sweat pants, running pants, or shorts, and fitted t-shirt)

Lecture Hours: 0    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 3    Credit Hours: 1

MUSC 105C          Introduction to Music

Offers a fundamental approach to perceptive listening based on a detailed study of several masterpieces representing different periods and forms. The pieces will be studied from aesthetic and historical perspectives.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

MUSC 106C          The History of Jazz, Blues, and Rock and Roll

Examines the history of three of America’s great musical contributions to world culture via detailed study of several masterpieces in each genre. Students will explore the fundamental musical elements, the historical roots, and the development of musical traditions of each style. Various listening and vocal music guides will facilitate the student’s knowledge and awareness.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

MUSC 107C          World Music

Through the exploration of soundscapes, or music within a cultural setting, students will learn sound characteristics and instrument classification that can be used for any type of music. Students will come to understand the significance of music within a culture. Students will develop critical listening skills and the vocabulary necessary to understand and evaluate music. No musical background is necessary.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

MUSC 150C          Introduction to Guitar

Offers a fundamental approach to learning the guitar for beginning students with varied levels of experience. Students will be involved with and exposed to performance situations, some practical applications of music theory, and different playing styles and techniques. Students must provide their own acoustic instruments.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

MUSC 155C          Vocal Production and Performance

Offers an opportunity to study various aspects of vocal production and performance, which will include vocal process from theory to application. The vocal process will focus on optimizing one’s vocal understanding through performance techniques and musicianship.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 101C          Acting I

Introduces drama as a performing art, with emphasis on physical movement and the use of voice in the development of characterization. Students will learn to use improvisation and theatre games to make feelings accessible to the student actor for the purpose of performance. The class will take a functional approach to the basic techniques of acting with an in-class performance final. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of acting that include action, relaxation, objective, spontaneity, emotion, monologues, texts, projection, presence, substitution, referential movement, character analyses, and heightened diction. It will include ideas about the rehearsal process, play scripts, scenes, staging, and performance.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 102C          Acting II

Continues Acting I and is an introduction to diverse acting approaches through the practical study of scenes and monologues in class. Exercises, exploring these various acting techniques, will be done in class and will be discussed/critiqued. The scene assignments may be taken from scripts assigned to students or be chosen by students with approval from the professor. Students will be required to work in and outside of class and to attend two plays in the course of the semester — one on campus, one off campus. Emphasis will be placed on the special demands of scene analysis, milieu study and characterization, as well as beginning directing technique. Comfortable clothing for movement required. (Prerequisite: THTR 101C with a grade of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 110C/ENGL 110C          Introduction to the Theatre

Provides a broad survey of the basic components of theatre. Students will examine plays, the history of theatre as an art, acting, technical theatre, theatre’s impact on society, and important practitioners in the field. Plays are unique in all of literature because they are only finished in performance in front of an audience. To understand how plays come to their complete realization, we will see several productions, both on and off campus. The student will be responsible for the cost of one ticket for an off-campus production.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 150C          Theater History: Prewriting to 1800

Examines theater history from pre-writing to the Restoration through the context of play reading and primary texts. The course studies how the interrelationships among technologies, ideologies, geography, history, architecture, politics, and social expectations related to culture affected theatre productions. Students will engage in investigative research and reporting.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 185C          Children’s Theatre

Examines techniques for theatre in the classroom, creative dramatics, and theatre for young audiences. It examines the dramatic structure, audience needs, directing, and acting techniques that are employed in the production of theatre for children and creative drama in the classroom. Practical and creative applications of scene design, costumes, make-up, and lighting are topics studied in the preparation of the final production. There will be a performance for young audiences at the end of the semester during class time. A $25 specialty course fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 220C          Playwriting

Illuminates and guides students through the art and craft of writing for performance. This course explores the fundamental principles needed to build a realistic play that is intended to be produced on the stage. Though the course is built around the construction of plays, the principles, writing exercises, readings, and other assignments serve as a solid base for any form of dialogue-driven writing. The class will culminate in the writing and staged-readings of 10-minute plays and performance texts. Students are expected to attend, at their own expense, one live theater production to be specified. (Prerequisite: ENGL 101C with a grade of C or higher.) Students receiving credit for THTR 120C cannot also receive credit for ENGL 295C.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 250C          Musical Theater

Explores American musical theatre. Students will study the work of the actor/singer/dancer and use their gained knowledge to develop as performers and intelligent audience members. Students will prepare and present as soloists as well as members of small groups and larger ensemble. Students will not only sing but will choreograph and block movement appropriate for each piece. Since this is a workshop course, students will prepare material for class presentation and critique. There will also be a focus on the audition process, as well as musical theatre history and repertoire. The class will participate in a culminating showcase performance to which the NHTI and extended community will be invited. THTR 101C strongly recommended. A $25 specialty course fee will be assessed for all students.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

THTR 255C          Directing

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, theories, and methods of play direction that emphasizes text analysis, leading to the creation of the prompt book and production of a one-act play. Productions will be performed on the auditorium stage before an audience scheduled on an evening that does not conflict with main stage productions, classes, or other previously scheduled events. (Prerequisites: THTR 101C and THTR 102C with grades of C or higher or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ASL 104C              American Sign Language for Beginners

Introduces students to basic knowledge and skills of American Sign Language. Students will achieve the beginning levels of fluency in communicating through the use of ASL.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

ASL 105C              Advanced American Sign Language

Teaches students the advanced skills and knowledge of American Sign Language. Students will achieve fluency in communicating through the use of ASL. (Prerequisite: ASL 104C)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CHIN 130C              Mandarin Chinese I

An introductory course for students with no background in the language. Students will learn to speak and understand standard Mandarin and read and write simplified Chinese characters. Students will develop speaking and listening skills through audiovisual media, interactive activities, and pair dialogue practice. Reading skills are developed through graded reading activities. Character writing practice and composing short pieces will develop writing skills. A strong emphasis on grammar provides the necessary framework to communicate clearly and effectively. Short lectures and the reading and sharing of current event news will develop an understanding of Chinese culture, past and present.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

CHIN 132C              Mandarin Chinese II

Designed for students who have been exposed to Mandarin Chinese and have knowledge of the Pinyin system. A strong interest in writing and learning characters is essential. Graded reading of short passages will help students remember Chinese characters and increase reading comprehension. Students will continue to improve pronunciation and tone. Conversation ability will continue to increase through listening and conversation practice. Chinese history and current events will be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHIN 130C or permission of the instructor)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

FREN 121C              French I

An introduction to basic French language, history, and culture through a balanced four-skills approach to learning through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. Multimedia resources, interactive language programs, videos, and the internet will be used. French I is geared toward students who have no previous knowledge of the language.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

FREN 122C              Elementary French II

A fully integrated intermediate French course that uses a multimedia approach to emphasize near-complete immersion in the French language and to build on the skills outlined in FREN 121C. French II is intended for students who have one or two years of high school French. (Prerequisite: FREN 121C or equivalent)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

GERM 115C              Elementary German I

Designed for beginning German students who are interested and motivated in speaking and learning about the rich German language and culture. It is designed for continued language study, travel, and business purposes. Since a native German speaker will be teaching the course, the emphasis will be in communicative as well as written skills of the living German language. Vocabulary and phonetics studies will be enhanced through visual and auditory means. Dialogue and oral presentations will help students form and develop these skills. For correct usage of the language, a strong grammar foundation will be given through multiple reading, speaking, writing, and listening practices. Current German topics will also be discussed and there will be German guest speakers.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

GERM 116C              Elementary German II

Designed for students who have been exposed to the German language and have knowledge of German present-, past-, and present perfect-tenses. Students should be motivated and interested in speaking German and learning about the rich German culture. The class is designed for continued language study, travel, and business purposes. Since a native German speaker will be teaching the course, the emphasis will be in communicative as well as written skills of the living German language. Vocabulary and phonetics will be enhanced through visual and auditory means. Dialogue and oral presentations will help in forming and developing these skills. For correct usage of the language a strong grammar foundation will be given through multiple reading, speaking, writing, and listening practices. German history and current German topics will also be discussed and there will be German guest speakers.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

SPAN 111C              Elementary Spanish I

A fully integrated introductory Spanish course. The course is designed for beginning Spanish students whose learning objectives and needs are in any of the following categories: continued language study, business purposes, or travel. The emphasis is to develop proficiency in communicative skills concentrating on the dynamic application of the living language taught through dialog, phonetics, and vocabulary. A strong grammar foundation and other basic language skills are taught through actual phrases and sentences, helping the student develop an instinctive sense of the correct usage. These objectives will be achieved through the following approaches: speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural studies.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

SPAN 112C              Elementary Spanish II

A fully integrated intermediate Spanish course. The course is designed for intermediate Spanish students whose learning objectives and needs are in any of the following categories: continued language study, business purposes, or travel. The emphasis is to consolidate and reinforce the language skills acquired in Elementary Spanish I or the equivalent and to continue building communicative skills and cultural appreciation. The course continues to offer a comprehensive review of basic first year grammar structures, while developing proficiency and advancement in communicative skills concentrating on the dynamic application of the living language taught through dialog, phonetics, and vocabulary. A strong grammar foundation and essential language skills are taught through actual phrases and sentences, helping the student develop an instinctive sense of the correct usage. These objectives will be achieved through the following approaches: speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural studies. (Prerequisite: SPAN 111C, the equivalent or permission of the department chair)

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

GST 100C             College Success Seminar

Introduces students to the foundations of college success and to the academic environment and community of NHTI. Academic advising, assessment of skills and interests, and career and transfer research help students to identify academic and professional goals and support lifelong learning. This course is required for all General Studies and Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts majors except for those enrolled in GST 102C or for those planning to apply for experiential credit. Please see the General Studies department chair for the Waiver Policy for this course.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

GST 101C              Assessment of Prior Learning

Required for all General Studies majors who wish to apply for experiential learning credit. It will assist  students in defining career objectives and preparing proposals for experiential learning credit. It will include advising and in-class writing sessions.

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

GST 102C              Study Strategies

Through the presentation of topics ranging from reading and study strategies to stress management, students become better equipped to adjust to the college experience and increase their chances of academic success. Individual periodic conferencing is also a key element of the course. It is open to all students and required for some AGS students. Waivers from GST 102C can be granted for students transferring two or more college-level classes with grades of B- or better. GST 102C will fulfill the GST 100C course requirement for all General Studies and Associate in Arts majors. GST 102C may not be taken as an elective to meet graduation requirements.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 2

GST 102EC              Study Strategies for Non-Native Speakers of American English

Through the presentation of topics ranging from reading and study strategies to stress and time management, students become better equipped to adjust to the American college experience and increase their chances of academic success. Group discussion and periodic individualized conferencing are also key elements of the course. GST 102EC will fulfill the GST 100C course requirement for all General Studies and Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts majors. GST 102EC may not be taken as an elective to meet graduation requirements. (Prerequisite: ESOL 201C or permission of the director of cross-cultural education; corequisite: ESOL 103C or permission of the director of cross-cultural education)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 1    Credit Hours: 2

GST 104C             Study Strategies Seminar

Designed for students who were required to take GST 102C and whose cumulative GPA is 2.69 or below after the first semester. This course provides students opportunities to further develop and apply college success strategies to their second-semester courses while maintaining contact with their academic advisor through frequent conferencing. GST 104C may not be taken as an elective to meet graduation requirements. (Prerequisite: GST 102C)

Lecture Hours: 1    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 1

GEOG 110C          Introduction to Cultural Geography

Focuses on economic, social, and cultural geography to study the relationships between humans and their natural environment. Students will review the basic physical geography concepts as well as ideas for reviewing and comparing cultural traditions, resources, globalization, and interaction of countries and regions. This class introduces students to the study of people, culture, arts, tourism, regions, and issues facing humanity.

Lecture Hours: 3    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 0    Credit Hours: 3

GEOL 101C           Essentials of Geology

Introduces students to the basic geological principles, including minerals, rock formation, volcanism, weathering, external and internal processes in sculpting and modifying landscapes, geologic time and history, global cycles, and human impacts on geological processes. Environmental resource use and conservation issues are also addressed. Required field trips. (Prerequisites: high school-level Biology with lab and high school-level Chemistry with lab, both with grades of C or higher)

Lecture Hours: 3 Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 2 Credit Hours: 4

GERN 195C          Gerontology Practicum I

The student will work in an approved gerontological setting under the supervision of an approved professional. Periodic conferences between the supervisor and practicum coordinator are planned evaluate the student’s progress. At the close of the semester, the student will submit documentation of the practicum activities/experience and demonstrate the ability to relate theory to practice in the chosen field of experience. The student will complete a total of 125 hours of field experience. (Prerequisites: HSV 111C, HSV 242C, MHTH 187C, PSYC 105C, and PYSC 283C, each with a grade of C or higher, and permission of the department chair.)

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

GERN 298C          Gerontology Practicum II

Students will continue their field experience work in an approved gerontological setting under the supervision of an approved professional. Skills, knowledge, and personal characteristics are built on and integrated into the learning and supervision of this course, as well as second-year coursework including ethics, individual counseling, and conflict resolution. Periodic conferences between the supervisor and practicum coordinator are planned to evaluate the student’s progress. At the close of the semester, the student will submit documentation of the practicum activities/experience and demonstrate the ability to relate theory to practice in the chosen field of experience. The student will complete a total of 125 hours of field experience. (Prerequisites: GERN 195C, HSV 111C, HSV 242C, MHTH 187C, PSYC 105C, and PYSC 283C, each with a grade of C or higher, and permission of the department chair) 

The student will also complete an interview with the practicum advisor the semester prior to the first scheduled practicum. Special requests regarding practicum entrance may be brought to the department chair by the student. Review of the requests will be made by the department faculty and special exemptions may be made for entrance into the practicum.

Lecture Hours: 2    Lab/Practicum/Clinical Hours: 8    Credit Hours: 4

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NHTIadmissions@ccsnh.edu
Phone: 603-230-4011

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